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Latest Geomyces Stories

UV Light Used As A New Tool To Detect White-Nose Syndrome In Bats
2014-05-30 12:22:49

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, biologists looking to identify bats with the deadly white-nose syndrome have a new, non-invasive tool – ultraviolet light. The study authors found that when they directed UV light at the wings of bats with WNS, microscopic skin lesions on the animals fluoresce with a distinctive orange-yellow color. “When we first saw this fluorescence of a bat wing in a cave, we knew...

Bat White Nose Fungus Is Rubust
2013-10-25 15:38:50

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A fungus has been decimating bat colonies for at least the last seven years, infecting bats during their winter hibernation, leaving them weak and vulnerable to starvation and secondary infections. Bats infected with Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans often have a distinctive white fungal growth around their muzzle, a sign of what is commonly referred to as white-nose syndrome. In a study published earlier this week by the journal...

White Nose Syndrome Relatives Found
2013-07-26 12:15:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online First identified in 2006 in upstate New York, White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has decimated the North American bat population, killing millions of animals over the past several years. According to a new report in the journal Fungal Biology, biologists from the US Forest Service have identified several benign relatives of the fungus that is believed to cause the disease. "Identification of the closest known relatives of this fungus makes...

White Nose Syndrome Detected Earlier In Bats Thanks To Better DNA Analysis
2013-03-14 08:15:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers studying White Nose Syndrome (WNS) identified a fungus called Geomyces destructans as the cause of the devastating disease, but until now have been unable to detect it without finding dead or dying bats. New research by a team of US Forest Service scientists and partners has identified additional species of Geomyces. The study, published in the journal Mycologia, describes the development of a highly sensitive...

Bats Get Help From A Manmade Cave
2012-09-15 05:28:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An artificial cave, designed to help protect bats from a fungal ailment that to date has killed more than six million of the creatures throughout North America, has been constructed by conservationists in the woods of Tennessee, according to various media outlets published Friday. The project, which Randall Dickerson of the Associated Press (AP) reports cost an estimated $300,000 and was built by The Nature Conservancy, is...

2012-04-12 23:01:13

Two Bucknell professors have received a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service grant to find out whether certain genetic characteristics, behavior and environmental factors contribute to the severity of the white-nose syndrome, which has killed up to 6.7 million bats in eastern North America. LEWISBURG, Pa. (PRWEB) April 12, 2012 Two Bucknell University biologists are leading an investigation into how and why some bats survive — and others die — when exposed to the tell-tale fungus...

Researcher Links Fungus To Dropping Bat Population
2011-10-31 13:21:51

A University of Tennessee researcher helped confirm the link between the fungus Geomyces destructans and the dropping bat population. Over a million bats were killed in North American in 2006, and little has been done to try and save them due to lack of evidence for the alleged killer. However, a new study has discovered that the fungus Geomyces destructans is the agent of White-noise Syndrome (WNS), which is the fungal disease decimating the bat population. The fungus has been...

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2011-02-15 07:00:00

Culling will not stop the spread of a deadly fungus that is threatening to wipe out hibernating bats in North America, according to a new mathematical model. White-nose syndrome, which is estimated to have killed over a million bats in a three year period, is probably caused by a newly discovered cold-adapted fungus, Geomyces destructans. The new model examines how WNS is passed from bat to bat and concludes that culling would not work because of the complexity of bat life history and because...

2011-02-03 17:41:30

Scientists suggest a roadmap to tackle disease which has killed over 1 million bats Conservationists across the United States are racing to discover a solution to White-Nose Syndrome, a disease that is threatening to wipe out bat species across North America. A review published in Conservation Biology reveals that although WNS has already killed one million bats, there are critical knowledge gaps preventing researchers from combating the disease. WNS is a fatal disease that targets...

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2011-02-03 12:33:17

New fungus has killed 1 million bats in eastern US; heading westA team of wildlife experts led by UC Davis called today for a national fight against a new fungus that has killed more than 1 million bats in the eastern United States and is spreading fast throughout North America."If we lose bats, we lose keystone species in some communities, predators that consume enormous numbers of insects, and beautiful wildlife species that are important parts of North America's biodiversity," said Janet...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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