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Latest George Mallory Stories

Top Of The World: Google Maps Show Off Everest And Other Peaks
2013-03-18 16:37:27

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online It was George Leigh Mallory who may have famously replied to the question “why do you want to climb Mount Everest” with the answer “because it´s there.” Whether he actually said those words or not is left to the ages, but what is certain is that Mallory and his climbing partner Andrew Irvine likely never made it to the summit of the world´s highest peak. Even if they did, which has been left to...

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2010-08-02 11:10:10

Research considers role of weather in historic Everest tragedy Their legend has inspired generations of mountaineers since their ill-fated attempt to climb Everest over 80 years ago, and now a team of scientists believe they have discovered another important part of the puzzle as to why George Mallory and Andrew Irvine never returned from their pioneering expedition. The research, published in Weather, explores the unsolved mystery and uses newly uncovered historical data collected during...

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2010-07-17 06:15:00

New photos taken from the same spot that British climber George Mallory captured on camera in 1921 show significant ice loss. The Asia Society (AS) arranged for the pictures to be taken. "The photographs reveal a startling truth: the ice of the Himalaya is disappearing," according to an AS statement. "They reveal an alarming loss in ice mass over an 89-year period." The photos taken by Mallory reveal a powerful, white, S-shaped sweep of ice on the mountain. Mountaineer David Breashears took...

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2010-05-18 10:50:00

An Australian adventurer plans to solve Mount Everest's greatest mystery this week by searching for long-lost evidence that the peak was conquered in 1924, 29 years earlier than previously thought. Mountaineer Duncan Chessell said conditions were the best in decades to find the missing body of Andrew "Sandy" Irvine and perhaps photographic evidence that he reached the peak first, along with Briton George Mallory. Mallory and Irvine perished near the summit during their expedition, leaving...

2008-06-24 06:02:20

By Stephen McGinty IT HAS been called the roof of the world and it is, by many accounts, quite filthy. Mount Everest, the highest peak on the planet, is a junkyard of oxygen cylinders, tinned food, abandoned tents, plastic bags of human waste, ladders, ropes, jackets, even bloody syringes and vials of unlabelled medication. The trail of detritus runs from the base camp in Tibet at 16,995ft and continues all the way to the summit at 29,035ft. The collective weight is estimated at 600...

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2008-01-11 09:00:00

Sir Edmund Hillary, who with Tenzing Norgay, his Sherpa guide, won worldwide acclaim in 1953 by becoming the first to scale Mount Everest, the world's tallest peak, died today in Auckland, New Zealand. He was 88. In the annals of great heroic exploits, the conquest of Mount Everest by Hillary, a lanky New Zealand mountaineer and explorer, and Norgay ranks with the first trek to the South Pole by Roald Amundsen in 1911 and the first nonstop trans-Atlantic flight by Charles Lindbergh in 1927....

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2006-07-15 16:00:00

KATMANDU, Nepal -- Sipping black tea on a glacial beach of jagged gray rocks nearly four miles above sea level, the lanky Briton had the air of a jilted lover who didn't want to admit it was over. Twice before, David Sharp had stood on this gravel plain in Mount Everest's shadow. In 2003 and again in 2004, the 34-year-old engineer had made it well into the "Death Zone" above 26,000 feet before weather, frostbite and lack of oxygen had forced him to turn around, just out of sight of the...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.