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Latest Georgetown University Medical Center Stories

2009-11-09 15:14:54

Physician bias might be the reason why African Americans are not receiving kidney/pancreas transplants at the same rate as similar patients in other racial groups. Dr. Keith Melancon, director of kidney and pancreas transplantation at Georgetown University Hospital and associate professor of surgery at Georgetown University Medical Center, and colleagues explore this phenomenon in the November issue of the American Journal of Transplantation. Medicare coverage for people needing a...

2009-11-05 11:22:00

WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- It's not very uncommon for a fundraising event to raffle a luxury car, but the Lexus being raffled Saturday night at the 23rd annual Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center Gala has a story behind it that exemplifies the drive to survive. In October of 2006, Suseel Kanagaratnam was diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer and he would begin a fight for his life. Stage IV means the cancer had spread to other organs internally leaving Suseel with a...

2009-10-21 13:02:16

Researchers have discovered that a primitive region of the brain responsible for sensorimotor control also has an important role in regulating emotional responses to threatening situations. This region appears to work in concert with another structure called the amygdala to regulate social and emotional behavior. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers have recently discovered that activation of a primitive brain region, the deep layers of superior colliculus (DLSC), elicits...

2009-10-20 19:19:28

Growth factors. They are the proteins that trigger a countless number of actions in cells. Drugs that increase or decrease certain growth factors have lead to treatments for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a new understanding of a growth factor implicated in some mental retardation disorders could lead to a novel treatment. Abnormalities in the number and shape of dendritic spines, the protrusions that allow communication between brain...

2009-10-20 19:13:55

Young animals treated with commonly-prescribed drugs develop behavioral abnormalities in adulthood say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. The drugs tested include those used to treat epilepsy, mood disorders and pain. GUMC neuroscientists and others have previously shown that neurons die after these drugs are administered to immature preclinical animal models. They say the regions of the brain where this drug-induced cell death takes place are important in the regulation of...

2009-10-20 18:51:02

Researchers say antiepilectic drug treatments administered when the brain is developing appear to trigger schizophrenia-like behavior in animal models. In humans, having a history of seizures in infancy is a significant risk factor for development of schizophrenia later in life, but it is not known whether the elevated risk is due to seizures themselves, or from side effects antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. In research presented at the 39th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience,...

2009-10-20 17:01:16

Music serves as a natural and non-invasive intervention for patients with severe neurological disorders to promote long-term memory, social interaction and communication. However, there is currently no plausible explanation of its neural basis for why and how music affects physical and psychosocial responses. Origins of music perception in humans may have their foundation in animal communication calls, as evidenced here in non-human primates. Many speech sounds and animal vocalizations, for...

2009-10-19 17:53:22

Glutamate is to the brain like coffee is to our bodies. A cup of Joe in the morning can wake us, but overloading on caffeine causes the stimulant to work against us. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in a mammal's central nervous system. It is an important component for neuroplasticity, the synaptic communication between neurons. It's also key to learning and memory. But in high concentrations, glutamate becomes toxic-- over-exciting the neurons. Glutamate-induced...

2009-10-19 07:39:41

New data about amyloid precursor protein, or APP, a protein implicated in development of Alzheimer's disease, suggests it also may have a positive role -- directly affecting learning and memory during brain development. So is APP good or bad? Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center say both, and that a balance of APP is critical. Alzheimer's disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, is characterized by neuronal cell death and a progressive loss of...

2009-10-18 12:05:14

New research clarifies how neurotransmitters like norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, are regulated "“ a finding that may help fine-tune therapies for depression. Current drugs for depression target the regulatory process for neurotransmitters, and while effective in some cases, do not appear to work in other cases. Recent findings suggest that synucleins, a family of small proteins in the brain, are key players in the management of neurotransmitters -- specifically, alpha- and...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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