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Latest Geothermal areas of Yellowstone Stories

Image 1 - Landsat Tracks Yellowstone's Underground Heat
2011-12-08 05:04:44

Yellowstone National Park sits on top of a vast, ancient, and still active volcano. Heat pours off its underground magma chamber, and is the fuel for Yellowstone´s famous features -- more than 10,000 hot springs, mud pots, terraces and geysers, including Old Faithful. But expected development by energy companies right outside Yellowstone´s borders have some fearing that Old Faithful could be cheated out of its energy. "If that geothermal development outside of the park begins,...

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2009-03-11 07:58:01

Arsenic may be tough, but scientists have found a Yellowstone National Park alga that's tougher. The alga -- a simple one-celled algae called Cyanidioschyzon -- thrives in extremely toxic conditions and chemically modifies arsenic that occurs naturally around hot springs, said Tim McDermott, professor in the Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences at Montana State University. Cyanidioschyzon could someday help reclaim arsenic-laden mine waste and aid in everything from space...

2008-01-15 12:45:00

The world's largest known hydrothermal explosion 13,000 years ago may have been created by tsunami-sized waves. That particular explosion created the Mary Bay crater which lies along the north edge of Yellowstone Lake and is over one mile across. Lisa Morgan of the U.S. Geological Survey said that there have been 20 hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone over the past 14,000 years, most of them leaving craters more than 100 yards across. These explosions are much larger than the similar...

2007-11-15 15:48:38

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) - Researchers who study the wilderness of heat-loving bacteria that thrives in Yellowstone's hot springs are starting to pay more attention to the even smaller organisms that keep those bacteria populations in check: viruses. A study by researchers at Montana State University and the Idaho National Laboratory concludes that certain viruses appear to migrate around Yellowstone on steam droplets. "To me, the big question is what do these viruses do in these hot springs?"...

2006-03-09 18:07:26

ESA -- Satellite images acquired by ESA's ERS-2 revealed the recently discovered changes in Yellowstone's caldera are the result of molten rock movement 15 kilometres below the Earth's surface, according to a recent study published in Nature. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry, InSAR for short, Charles Wicks, Wayne Thatcher and other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists mapped the changes in the northern rim of the caldera, or crater, and discovered it had risen about 13...

2006-03-02 04:22:35

BILLINGS, Mont. -- A newly discovered surface bulge in Yellowstone National Park may be responsible for some unexpected geothermal activity in recent years, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey scientists. The bulge, about 25 miles across, rose 5 inches from 1997 to 2003 and may have triggered some thermal unrest at Norris Geyser Basin, including a sudden rise in temperatures, new steam vents and the awakening of Steamboat geyser. The findings are part of a paper set to be...

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2005-04-21 07:30:00

pH value in rock pores where organisms live acidic enough to dissolve nails, say researchers University of Colorado at Boulder researchers say a bizarre group of microbes found living inside rocks in an inhospitable geothermal environment at Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park could provide tantalizing new clues about ancient life on Earth and help steer the hunt for evidence of life on Mars. The CU-Boulder research team reported the microbes were discovered in the pores of rocks in a...


Latest Geothermal areas of Yellowstone Reference Libraries

Yellowstone National Park
2013-04-17 13:14:01

Yellowstone National Park is located in the United States. The majority of the park is located in Wyoming, but there are smaller areas of the park in Idaho and Montana. It is thought that this area was the first to be established as a national park in the entire world. The area was home to Native Americans for about 11,000 years, but was not well known to Americans until the 1860’s, when the first organized explorations were conducted there. The Lewis and Clark Expedition in the 19th...

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