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Latest Geriatric depression Stories

2011-11-02 08:58:39

Regular physical activity is associated with a lower risk of suffering depression in old age. This is shown by one of the largest studies on elderly Europeans to have been carried out, by researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, among others. Research also shows that self-determined motivation and perceived competence are important factors in persuading elderly people to exercise more. "We do not yet know for sure what the causal relationship between physical activity and...

2010-11-10 00:52:06

MU researchers find non-mood changes related to depression in elderly Depression affects approximately 30 to 40 percent of nursing home residents, but it often goes unrecognized, according to American Geriatrics Society, which can lead to lower quality of life or even suicide. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found a series of indicators, other than changes in mood that are associated with the development of depression in nursing home residents. "Prompt diagnosis and...

2010-10-08 08:11:28

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- People of all ages suffer from major depressive disorder.  It's a condition that plagues the young, the old, and everyone in-between.  However, depression among elderly homebound individuals has skyrocketed in the past few years, and little has been done to help these individuals get their feet back on the ground. "Using telemedicine in home care to provide disease management for geriatric depression is timely for several reasons," which Thomas Sheeran, Ph.D.,...

2010-10-04 17:00:33

Findings of a pilot study to be presented at national meeting Studies have shown a high rate of depression among elderly homebound individuals, and few patients receive adequate treatment, if any. To address this issue, researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and other organizations have developed a telemedicine-based depression care protocol in home health care. The early findings from their pilot study will be presented at the 29th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the National Association for...

2010-09-16 16:59:39

Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease and their interactive associations on mortality in middle-aged adults: the Whitehall II cohort study The combination of depression and heart disease seems to be far more lethal than having either one of these conditions in isolation, suggests research published online in Heart. Previous research has indicated that people who are depressed, but otherwise healthy, are more likely to develop coronary heart disease, irrespective of what...

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2009-03-10 14:30:00

Researchers from Columbia University reported new evidence that depression can lead to heart disease. According to the Associated Press, doctors have long known that depression is common after a heart attack or stroke, and often worsens a patient's outcome. However, a long-running Nurses' Health Study between 1992 and 2004 tracked 63,000 women who had no signs of heart disease when the study began, but showed that nearly 8 percent had evidence of serious depression. The 12-year study...

2008-07-25 15:01:07

U.S. researchers say aid from their daughters-in-law -- rather their own children -- helped reduce depression experienced by elderly rural Chinese. In what the researchers call a new twist on the Confucian ideal of filial piety, the study, published in the Journal of Marriage and Family, found assistance from their own children actually increased depression among some older people in rural China. University of Southern California, Davis researchers Zhen Cong and Merril Silverstein...

2006-05-15 14:26:13

By Charnicia Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Consistent feelings of sadness or depression may predict later nursing home admission among seniors, study findings show. "Even after taking into account physical health and functional status, people with unmanaged depression are much more likely to be admitted to a nursing home," study author, Dr. Yael Harris, of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in Baltimore, told Reuters Health. This suggests that "appropriate...

2006-03-23 10:25:07

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - "Late-life" depression affects as many as 16 percent of older folks, harms quality of life, increases the risk of death and costs society a bundle each year. A new study shows that preventing the onset of depression during the golden years is not only possible but worth the cost. From a public health perspective, preventing late-life depression may be "an attractive, if not imperative, means to generate health gains and reduce future costs," researchers...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.