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Latest Gerta Keller Stories

2009-05-05 09:38:16

U.S. geoscientist Gerta Keller says she's compiled conclusive evidence that a meteorite did not wipe out the dinosaurs. Keller, a Princeton University professor, said she and her research team have disproved the popular theory that an asteroid eliminated the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago. She said her examinations at several new sites have produced biotic evidence -- the fossilized traces of plants and animals -- indicating a massive die-off did not occur directly after an asteroid...

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2009-05-04 13:06:32

Data is conclusive, says Keller, who hopes to move on from decades-old controversy A Princeton University geoscientist who has stirred controversy with her studies challenging a popular theory that an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs has compiled powerful new evidence asserting her position. Gerta Keller, whose studies of rock formations at many sites in the United States, Mexico and India have led her to conclude that volcanoes, not a vast meteorite, were the more likely culprits in the...

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2009-04-27 09:15:00

Impact didn't lead to mass extinction 65 million years ago, geologists find The enduringly popular theory that the Chicxulub crater holds the clue to the demise of the dinosaurs, along with some 65 percent of all species 65 million years ago, is challenged in a paper to be published in the Journal of the Geological Society on April 27, 2009. The crater, discovered in 1978 in northern Yucutan and measuring about 180 kilometers (112 miles) in diameter, records a massive extra-terrestrial...

2008-12-15 13:17:15

A U.S. geosciences professor says dinosaurs died gradually from climate change caused by volcanic eruptions in India and not because of a meteor strike. Gerta Keller of Princeton University admits her theory contradicts the long-held hypothesis that dinosaurs died due to climate change after a giant meteor hit the Yucatan region of Mexico. Keller bases her theory on her National Science Foundation-funded field work in India and Mexico that uncovered geologic evidence that the mass extinction...

2007-11-05 12:00:16

A U.S. study suggests violent volcanic eruptions in India might have killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, not a meteor impact. The eruptions created India's gigantic Deccan Traps lava beds and the research by Princeton University paleontologist Gerta Keller marks the first time a study has directly linked the main phase of the Deccan Traps' creation to the mass extinction. Keller said she made the linkage using microscopic marine fossils that are known to have evolved immediately...

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2006-10-24 10:15:00

There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. The Chicxulub impact may, in fact, have been the lesser and earlier of a series of meteors and volcanic eruptions that pounded life on Earth for more than 500,000 years, say Princeton University...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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