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Latest Giant Aye-aye Stories

Researchers Sequence Endangered Aye-Aye Lemur Genome
2013-03-25 18:40:04

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A group of American and Canadian scientists has announced the complete genomic sequencing of three populations of aye-ayes, which is being considered a major victory in the battle to save the unique lemurs. Found only on Madagascar, the aye-aye was recently was classified as "Endangered" by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). "The aye-aye is one of the world's most unusual and fascinating animals,"...


Latest Giant Aye-aye Reference Libraries

Aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis
2012-08-03 15:38:35

The aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a species of lemur that is native only to the island of Madagascar. This species is the only remaining member in the Daubentonia genus. Its range is slightly fragmented in some areas. It derives its scientific name from Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton, a French naturalist, and from the island on which it was first discovered. Aye-ayes prefer a habitat within deciduous forests or rainforests, with most occurring in rainforests, but can inhabit...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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