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Latest Giant tube worm Stories

2009-03-18 09:11:43

Somewhere out there in the ocean, SpongeBob SquarePants has a teeny-tiny cousin and a humongous uncle.That's just what one would expect from a new analysis of body sizes across all orders of animal life that was conducted by researchers at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), in Durham, N.C. and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.Researchers Craig McClain and Alison Boyer created a giant database on body sizes across all orders of animal life and found that phyla...


Latest Giant tube worm Reference Libraries

Giant Tube Worm, Riftia pachyptila
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Tube Worm (Riftia pachyptila) is a species of marine invertebrate related to tube worms and commonly found in the intertidal and pelagic zones. This species lives from a mile to several miles deep underwater, on the floor of the Pacific Ocean near black smokers, where it is able to tolerate extremely high hydrogen sulfide levels. The common name “giant tube worm” is also applied to the largest living species of shipworm, Kuphus polythalamia. Despite given the name...

Lamellibrachia luymesi
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Lamellibrachia luymesi is a species of tube worm in the Siboglinidae family. It is found in the Gulf of Mexico in deep-sea cold seeps where hydrocarbons are leaking from the seafloor, typically at depths of 1,600 to 2,600 feet. This species can reach lengths over 10 feet, and grows very slowly, living more than 250 years. It forms biogenic habitat by creating large aggregations of hundreds to thousands of individuals. Living in these aggregations are over a hundred different species of...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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