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Last updated on April 25, 2014 at 1:22 EDT

Latest Gifford Miller Stories

Arctic Summer Temperatures Warmest They Have Been In 120,000 Years
2013-10-24 13:14:11

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a study published in Geophysical Research Letters, the past 100 years could be the warmest the planet has been in 120,000 years. University of Colorado Boulder researchers said that average summer temperatures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic during the last 100 years are higher now than during any century in the past 44,000 years, and maybe even as long ago as 120,000 years. The study is the first direct evidence that the...

Ecosystem Changes Drove Extinction In Pleistocene Australia
2012-06-07 06:50:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Scientists may have finally established the explanation for the disappearance of the giant koala and other Australian megafauna. Between 50,000 and 45,000 years ago, around 60 species of mammals, predominantly foraging herbivores called browsers, went extinct. These animals included 19 species that weighed over 100 kilograms, like the rhinoceros-sized giant wombat and half-ton marsupial Palorchestes azael. Slightly smaller animals like the flightless bird...

Was Little Ice Age Caused By Increased Volcanism In The Middle Ages?
2012-05-10 08:19:09

A large part of the Northern Hemisphere was in the midst of an unusual cold snap for nearly 500 years, from the Middle Ages through the early 19th century, in what scientists now call the “Little Ice Age.” A new study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, has probed the longstanding mystery of when this event actually began, what caused it and how it was sustained for such a long period. Gifford Miller, a climatologist at the University of Colorado at...

New Study Sheds Light On Little Ice Age
2012-01-30 15:44:41

University of Colorado researchers report that they have answered some questions surrounding Earth's Little Ice Age, which started between A.D. 1275 and 1300, and lasted into the late 19th century. According to the new study, the Little Ice Age was triggered by repeated, explosive volcanism and sustained by a self-perpetuating sea ice-ocean feedback system in the North Atlantic Ocean. Professor Gifford Miller, who led the study, said the team's evidence from radiocarbon dates from dead...

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2008-01-28 11:04:45

Researchers also find tantalizing evidence that ancient tropical eruptions of volcanoes triggered Little Ice Age A new University of Colorado at Boulder study has shown that ice caps on the northern plateau of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic have shrunk by more than 50 percent in the last half century as a result of warming, and are expected to disappear by the middle of the century. Radiocarbon dating of dead plant material emerging from beneath the receding ice margins show the Baffin...

2005-09-14 13:51:38

By Joseph A. Giannone NEW YORK (Reuters) - Democrats hoping to unseat Republican Mayor Michael Bloomberg averted a runoff for their party's nomination when the runner-up conceded on Wednesday and threw his support to the top vote-getter in this week's primary. The move leaves former Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer set to face the popular incumbent Bloomberg in the November election. Ferrer would be the city's first Latino mayor if he wins the November 8 general election....

2005-07-19 16:42:31

By Ellen Wulfhorst NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York Republican Mayor Michael Bloomberg is so far ahead of his Democratic challengers that he could be re-elected even if his own party members stayed home on Election Day, a poll showed on Tuesday. The first-term mayor leads each of the four Democrats in the race for City Hall by as much as 15 points, and his approval rating is as high as when he first took office, said the survey by Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. Two-thirds of voters...

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2005-07-07 14:51:12

A shifting diet of two flightless birds inhabiting Australia tens of thousands of years ago is the best evidence yet that early humans may have altered the continent's interior with fire, changing it from a mosaic of trees, shrubs and grasses to the desert scrub evident today, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder-led team. The unprecedented ecosystem disruption is now thought to have led to the extinction of Australia's large terrestrial mammals, which disappeared shortly after...