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Latest Gila monster Stories

Lizard Spit Shown To Reduce Food Cravings
2012-05-16 08:24:06

A new drug made from the saliva of the Gila monster lizard reduces cravings for food, according to researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. An increasing number of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes are offered a pharmaceutical preparation called Exenatide, which helps them to control their blood sugar. The drug is a synthetic version of a natural substance called exendin-4, which is obtained from a rather unusual source — the saliva of the Gila...

2011-09-19 22:50:00

Gila monsters are large venomous lizards. Although envenomation by the Gila monster is not often fatal to adult humans, it results in intense pain, swelling, weakness, and nausea. A team of researchers, led by Stephen Galli, at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, has now uncovered a natural mechanism by which mice reduce the toxicity, and thereby the morbidity and mortality, of Gila monster venom – immune cells known as mast cells release the protein MCPT4, which degrades...

2011-06-02 12:44:33

Who would have thought that Gila monster saliva would be the inspiration for a blockbuster new drug for Type 2 diabetes? Or that medicines for chronic pain, heart attacks, high blood pressure and stroke would emerge from venom of the Magician's cone snail, the saw-scaled viper, the Brazilian lancehead snake and the Southeastern pygmy rattlesnake? These are just some of the sources contributing to the emergence of potential new drugs based on "peptides" that is the topic of the cover story in...

2011-04-21 12:00:00

SANTA FE, N.M., April 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Next week, Silver City, New Mexico, gears up to celebrate the Silver Anniversary of the SRAM Tour of the Gila. Now in its 25th year, the cycling stage race, which began in 1987, is staking its claim as the nation's most historic, thanks to the dramatic backdrop on which the race itself is set. Running April 27-May 1, 2011, riders in the SRAM Tour of the Gila center their remarkable adventure in Silver City, New Mexico, near the birthplace of...

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2009-05-19 13:44:50

Australian researchers have discovered what makes the Komodo dragon's bite so deadly for its prey. Scientists previously considered that the world's largest lizard's mouth held deadly bacteria that stopped its victims' blood from clotting. Walter Auffenberg put that theory forward in 1981. But lead researcher Bryan Fry used magnetic resonance imagery to show that the deadly lizard packs a venomous bite, as seen through its venom gland with ducts that lead to their teeth. Fry used 3-D computer...


Latest Gila monster Reference Libraries

41_532b43ed661dd5d177a7fbabf489932f
2007-01-02 11:41:40

The Beaded Lizard or Mexican Beaded Lizard, Heloderma horridum, is a venomous lizard found in Mexico and the southern United States. Adult Mexican Beaded Lizards range from 13 to 18 inches in length. Until recently, the beaded lizard and the Gila Monster were the only two lizards known to be venomous. Research showed that some iguanas and monitors are also venomous. The beaded lizards' venom is similar to that of some snakes (e.g. the western diamondback rattler).

36_67c6fec75293d7e1e91a0c52aa692cf7
2005-06-22 14:17:05

The Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) is one of the two known species of venomous lizards. This lizard lives in the deserts of the southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico. It is a heavy, slow moving lizard and can measure up to 2 feet (60 cm) in length. Its skin has the appearance of beads in the colors black, pink, orange, and yellow, laid down in intricate patterns across the animal's body. Unlike a snake, the Gila monster envenomates its victim through grooves in the teeth of its...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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