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Latest Gill Bejerano Stories

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2011-03-10 06:05:00

Scientists have analyzed the genomes of humans and closely related primates and discovered over 500 regulatory regions that chimpanzees and mammals have that humans do not.  Gill Bejerano, a biologist at Stanford University School of Medicine, and colleagues found that humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of human brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. "Rather than looking for species-specific differences in specific...

2011-03-09 16:34:23

Humans are clearly different from chimpanzees. The question is, why? According to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, it may boil down in part to what we don't have, rather than what we do. The loss of snippets of regulatory DNA, the scientists found, could be the reason why, for example, humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of our brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. Understanding these and other...

2010-05-03 09:45:37

Life is almost unbearably complex. Humans and mice, frogs and flies toggle genes on and off in dizzying combinations and sequences during their relentless march from embryo to death. Now scientists seeking to understand the machinations of the proteins behind the genomic wizard's screen have a powerful new tool at their disposal, courtesy of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Until now, researchers have relied on outdated methods of analysis to identify those DNA...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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