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Latest Glacial period Stories

Glacial History Affects Alpine Plant's Shape And Growth Habit
2013-10-17 08:17:50

University of Basel During the Ice Ages the European Alps were covered by a thick layer of ice. Climate fluctuations led to great changes in the occurrences of plants: They survived the cold periods in refugia on the periphery of the Alps which they then repopulated after the ice had drawn back. Such processes in the history of the earth can be detected by molecular analysis as "genetic fingerprints": refugia and colonization routes can be identified as genetic groups within the plant...

Early Britons Hunted Elephants
2013-09-19 11:08:15

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After digging up the remains of a prehistoric elephant and some crude hunting tools in 2003, archaeologists at the University of Southampton now say they have proof that early humans worked together to bring these beasts down. These early humans lived thousands of years before the Neanderthals, the ancient species which most closely resembled modern humans. Until this discovery it was not known how these early humans came to migrate...

Last Glacial Maximum Peaked In Spain Much Earlier Than Elsewhere
2013-08-26 14:15:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While it’s widely believed that the world’s massive ice sheets were at their greatest extent 20,000 years ago during the last glacial maximum, new research published in Scientific Reports suggested that the glacial peak was much earlier in modern-day Spain. According to study researchers, their findings could inform more localized models of glacier activity and be used to calculate the effects of climate change. “We wanted to...

More Than A Million Years of Climate History Revealed
2012-08-10 13:25:58

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Cambridge Department of Earth Sciences has successfully reconstructed temperature from the deep sea to reveal how global ice volume has varied over the glacial-interglacial cycles of the past 1.5 million years. The study, "Evolution of ocean temperature and ice volume through the Mid-Pleistocene Climate Transition," reported in the journal Science, announces a major breakthrough in understanding...

Climate In Arctic More Vulnerable Than Thought
2012-06-25 10:10:11

First analyses of the longest sediment core ever collected on land in the terrestrial Arctic provide documentation that intense warm intervals, warmer than scientists thought possible, occurred there over the past 2.8 million years First analyses of the longest sediment core ever collected on land in the terrestrial Arctic, published this week in Science, provide documentation that intense warm intervals, warmer than scientists thought possible, occurred there over the past 2.8 million...

Eemian Period Is A Poor Analogue For Current Climate Change
2012-06-15 04:34:14

The Eemian interglacial period that began some 125,000 years ago is often used as a model for contemporary climate change. In the international journal “Geophysical Research Letters” scientists from Mainz, Kiel and Potsdam (Germany) now present evidence that the Eemian differed in essential details from modern climatic conditions. Joint press release of the Academy of the Sciences and the Literature Mainz and the GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. To address...

Caltech Researchers Use Stalagmites To Study Past Climate Change
2012-05-04 05:39:29

There is an old trick for remembering the difference between stalactites and stalagmites in a cave: Stalactites hold tight to the ceiling while stalagmites might one day grow to reach the ceiling. Now, it seems, stalagmites might also fill a hole in our understanding of Earth's climate system and how that system is likely to respond to the rapid increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since preindustrial times. Many existing historical climate records are biased to the high latitudes–...

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2011-08-05 09:26:04

Scientists at the University of York, using an 'amino acid time capsule', have led the largest ever program to date the British Quaternary period, stretching back nearly three million years. It is the first widespread application of refinements of the 40-year-old technique of amino acid geochronology. The refined method, developed at York's BioArCh laboratories, measures the breakdown of a closed system of protein in fossil snail shells, and provides a method of dating archaeological and...

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2011-03-01 09:52:45

Cooling trend could be on the way unless thwarted by greenhouse gasses There's an old saying that if you don't like the weather in New Mexico, wait five minutes. Maybe it should be amended to 10,000 years, according to new research. In a letter published recently in the journal Nature, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers and an international team of scientists report that the Southwest region of the United States undergoes "megadroughts""”warmer, more arid periods lasting...

2010-08-03 13:56:33

An international science team involving the University of Colorado at Boulder that is working on the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling project hit bedrock July 27 after two summers of work, drilling down more than 1.5 miles in an effort to help assess the risks of abrupt future climate change on Earth. Led by Denmark and the United States, the team recovered ice from the Eemian interglacial period from about 115,000 to 130,000 years ago, a time when temperatures were 3.6 to 5.4 degrees...