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Latest Glacier Stories

greenland ice sheet sea level rise
2014-05-19 05:14:22

University of California - Irvine Major UCI-NASA work reveals long, deep valleys connecting ice cap to the ocean Greenland's icy reaches are far more vulnerable to warm ocean waters from climate change than had been thought, according to new research by UC Irvine and NASA glaciologists. The work, published May 18 in Nature Geoscience, shows previously uncharted deep valleys stretching for dozens of miles under the Greenland Ice Sheet. The bedrock canyons sit well below sea level,...

Thwaites Glacier
2014-05-12 13:27:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A rapidly melting region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to have reached an irreversible state of decline, meaning that nothing can be done to prevent the glaciers from melting into the sea, researchers from NASA and the University of California, Irvine claim in a new study. The researchers came to that conclusion after analyzing four decades worth of data on glaciers located in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica....

2014-05-12 12:21:32

WASHINGTON, May 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study by researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, finds a rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in an irreversible state of decline, with nothing to stop the glaciers in this area from melting into the sea. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20081007/38461LOGO The study presents multiple lines of evidence, incorporating 40 years of observations that indicate the glaciers...

antarctic peninsula
2014-05-12 08:53:16

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Antarctica’s ice shelf lays motionless at the surface, but 250 miles below, the Earth is moving at an incredible rate, according to recent research. The new study explains why the upward movement of the Earth’s crust is happening so rapidly in the northern Antarctic Peninsula and was published in this week’s Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Scientists from Newcastle University in the UK led the research with assistance...

The Red Sea Is An Ocean Like All Others
2014-05-07 03:44:56

GEOMAR GEOMAR researchers specify models for the birth of the youngest world ocean Actually, the Red Sea is an ideal study object for marine geologists. There they can observe the formation of an ocean in its early phase. However, the Red Sea seemed to go through a different birthing process than the other oceans. Now, Scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah were able to show that salt glaciers have distorted the...

Zhadang glacier
2014-05-07 07:20:49

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team of 74 scientists from 18 countries, mostly working on an unpaid volunteer basis, have mapped and catalogued nearly 200,000 glaciers, creating the first-ever global inventory of icebergs and ice floes. The catalogue, which was compiled as part of the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) project, includes information about locations and size. It will allow for calculations of volume, as well as their ongoing contributions to...

Accidental Find Offers Big Potential For Research On Alaska's Glaciers
2014-05-01 03:38:49

Seismological Society of America Alaska's seismic network records thousands of quakes produced by glaciers, capturing valuable data that scientists could use to better understand their behavior, but instead their seismic signals are set aside as oddities. The current earthquake monitoring system could be "tweaked" to target the dynamic movement of the state's glaciers, suggests State Seismologist Michael West, who will present his research today at the annual meeting of the Seismological...

Massive Iceberg Could Disrupt Shipping Lanes In The Southern Ocean
2014-04-23 08:56:59

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An iceberg previously said to be more than eight times the size of Manhattan could soon disrupt shipping lanes as it moves well outside of Pine Island Bay in Antarctica. The iceberg (called B31), which broke off from Pine Island Glacier in November 2013, is now drifting out of the bay and into the Amundsen Sea off Antarctica’s western banks. Now said to be twice the size of Atlanta (six times the size of Manhattan), B31 will...

Ancient Landscape Found Beneath Greenland Ice Sheet
2014-04-18 11:47:38

[ Watch The Video: Ancient Soil Found Under Greenland Ice Sheet ] By Joshua E. Brown, University of Vermont Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland Ice Sheet, below two miles of ice. "We found organic soil that has been frozen to the bottom of the...


Latest Glacier Reference Libraries

Glacier National Park (US)
2013-03-19 14:40:11

Glacier National Park is located in the American state of Montana, south of the Canadian borders of British Columbia and Alberta. The park contains one million acres of varying landscape with a wide range of plant and animal life. It holds two mountain ranges, over 130 discovered and named lakes, and 16,000 square miles of protected unspoiled ecosystem known as the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. The history of human presence in the Glacier National Park area is thought to begin about...

Glacier Bay National Park And Preserve
2013-03-19 13:07:23

Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve is located in the Alaska panhandle, west of the city of Juneau. The establishment of the park first began in 1925, when Calvin Coolidge signed the bill that would make the Glacier Bay area a national monument. After an expansion occurred in 1978 by President Jimmy Carter, the park increased in size by 523,000 acres under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). This act helped expand the park again in 1980, while it was in the...

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Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'