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Latest Glaciology Stories

2013-08-21 14:26:33

A new paper co-written by UM associate professor Mark Hebblewhite details ecological changes caused by a loss of Arctic sea ice. The paper concludes that the loss of sea ice obviously will impact the marine food web and the marine mammals that depend on sea ice habitat. Other major ecological changes in adjacent land-based habitats and species also will occur because of warming oceans. The findings were published in the Aug. 2 issue of Science magazine. Wildlife species like the polar...

West Antarctica Deglaciation Began Much Earlier Than Thought
2013-08-15 10:21:16

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the deepest ice cores ever drilled in Antarctica is revealing some interesting evidence about the southern continent’s turbulent past and the role Earth’s orbit played in the history of the ice ages. Scientists have known for more than a century that ice ages come and go due to the wobbling of the Earth as it orbits the sun. Increases in the intensity of summer sunlight in the Northern Hemisphere melted the ice sheets...

Glacial Melt Minimal Effect On Sea Level
2013-08-13 09:47:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Occasionally, melt water on top of a glacier will trickle down to the bedrock below and act as a lubricant for the glacier’s movements. Once thought to be a major contributor to sea-level rise, melt water was found to have only a minor effect on sea level in a new study from a team of European and American scientists. Using computer modeling based on observations of Greenland’s ice sheet, the research team concluded glacier...

Greenland Ice Sheet Is Melting From Below
2013-08-12 04:20:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online High heat flow from the mantle into the lithosphere is causing the Greenland ice sheet to melt from below, according to new research published in Sunday’s online edition of the journal Nature Geoscience. This phenomenon, the researchers explain, is very variable spatially and originates in an exceptionally thin lithosphere (the Earth’s crust and upper mantle). As a result, they report there is an increase in the heat flow from...

Wildlife Greatly Impacted By Arctic Sea-Ice Loss
2013-08-02 07:11:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Because sea ice is at its lowest point in 1,500 years, scientists are questioning how ecological communities in the Arctic will be affected by this continued and perhaps accelerating melting process over the next two decades. An international team of scientists, led by Penn State University biologist Eric Post, examined relationships among algae, plankton, whales, and terrestrial animals such as caribou, arctic foxes, and walrus, as...

Polar Pool Not Extreme
2013-07-31 11:23:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Last week, pictures from the North Pole Experimental Observatory (NPEO) showed the North Pole seemingly covered by a sea of water, but according to a statement from the project's principal investigator, conditions in the Arctic are typical for this time of year and viewing the images is all a matter of perspective. "Every summer when the sun melts the surface the water has to go someplace, so it accumulates in these ponds," said Jamie...

Arctic Winters Were Ice-Free Three To Five Million Years Ago
2013-07-30 06:29:43

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During the Pliocene Epoch, the Earth was substantially warmer than it is today, despite similar concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. A new study, led by the University of Colorado Boulder, suggests year-round ice-free conditions across the surface of the Arctic Ocean could explain the difference. The study was published in a recent issue of Palaeogeography, Paleoclimatology, Palaeoecology. A new record was marked by...

Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Previously Thought
2013-07-24 17:51:21

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists reported in the journal Scientific Reports that permafrost in a section of Antarctica is melting faster than expected. Data from Garwood Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica has shown that melt rates accelerated consistently from 2001 to 2012, rising to about ten times the valley's historical average for the present geologic epoch. Scientists previously thought the region's ground ice to be in equilibrium,...


Latest Glaciology Reference Libraries

Columbia Plateau
2013-04-19 16:35:47

The Columbia Plateau ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington, with little areas over the Washington state border in Idaho. This ecoregion stretches across a wide swath of the Columbia River Basin from the Dalles, Oregon to Lewiston, Idaho to Okanogan, Washington near the Canadian border. It incorporates nearly 500 miles of the Columbia River, as well as the lower reaches of major tributaries....

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

Meltwater
2009-07-06 17:15:30

Meltwater is water that is released from melting snow or ice. This includes meltwater from glacial ice and ice shelves over oceans. Meltwater is often produced during volcanic eruptions, and can cause dangerous lahars (landslides of wet volcanic debris). When meltwater pools on the surface rather than draining or flowing away, it forms pools known as melt ponds. Meltwater will often refreeze as the temperature drops. Meltwater can also collect or melt under the ice's surface. Sub-glacial...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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