Quantcast

Latest Glaciology Stories

Arctic Winters Were Ice-Free Three To Five Million Years Ago
2013-07-30 06:29:43

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During the Pliocene Epoch, the Earth was substantially warmer than it is today, despite similar concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. A new study, led by the University of Colorado Boulder, suggests year-round ice-free conditions across the surface of the Arctic Ocean could explain the difference. The study was published in a recent issue of Palaeogeography, Paleoclimatology, Palaeoecology. A new record was marked by...

Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Previously Thought
2013-07-24 17:51:21

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists reported in the journal Scientific Reports that permafrost in a section of Antarctica is melting faster than expected. Data from Garwood Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica has shown that melt rates accelerated consistently from 2001 to 2012, rising to about ten times the valley's historical average for the present geologic epoch. Scientists previously thought the region's ground ice to be in equilibrium,...

Study Explains Surprising Acceleration Of Greenland's Inland Ice
2013-07-24 14:49:30

NASA [ Watch The Video Greenland Ice Flow ] Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, a new NASA-funded study finds. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or "snouts," of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast. Now, the new research shows that the interior regions are also...

Glacier Geometry Linked To Diverse Calving Patterns
2013-07-23 05:24:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Large stretches of ice on the coasts of Antarctica and Greenland are at risk of rapidly cracking apart and falling into the ocean in events over the coming decades that could aggravate sea level rise. The new study, published in Nature Geoscience, describes new iceberg calving simulations from the University of Michigan. "If this starts to happen and we're right, we might be closer to the higher end of sea level rise estimates for...

Ancient Antarctic Ice Melt 66 Feet
2013-07-22 08:50:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A large team of international researchers has looked millions of years into the Antarctic past and found evidence that massive sections of the continent's eastern ice sheet once melted to raise sea levels by around 66 feet. "Scientists previously considered the East Antarctic ice sheet to be more stable than the much smaller ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland, even though very few studies of East Antarctic ice...

Understanding The Mechanisms Of Supraglacial Lake Drainage
2013-07-17 11:03:06

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Lakes often form on top of a glacier and drain onto the bedrock below, lubricating a glacier's movements as a result. A new study from an international group of researchers has found that the way these lakes drain can affect the velocity, extent and direction of a glacier's progress. Previous research has focused on the lubrication action of supraglacial lakes after they drain, but not on the draining mechanism itself. According to the...

Rising Sea Levels Will Require Adaptation For Generations To Come
2013-07-17 05:46:24

Susan Bowen for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Current levels of greenhouse gas emissions will have far-reaching effects, even if the levels decrease in the near future. According to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the greenhouse gases emitted today will cause the sea level to rise for centuries to come. It is estimated each degree of global warming will raise sea levels by more than two meters. Anders Levermann, lead author of the...

Satellite Data Not Enough Predict Ice Cap Melt
2013-07-15 09:38:00

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a team of European scientists has found there is not enough satellite data to determine the rate of polar ice cap melt very far into the future and warned against using current trends to predict sea level rise that might result from melting glaciers. The ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica represent the biggest potential contributor to sea level rise. According to a study published last year including data from...

Surface Melt Will Continue To Dominate Greenland Ice-Loss
2013-07-10 15:13:45

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to research published in the Journal of Glaciology, surface ice melt will be the dominant process controlling ice-loss from Greenland. Greenland's ice sheet is considered an important potential contributor to future global sea-level rise over the next century or longer. It contains an amount of ice that could lead to a rise of global sea-level by more than 22 feet if it completely melted. Changes in its total mass are caused...


Latest Glaciology Reference Libraries

Columbia Plateau
2013-04-19 16:35:47

The Columbia Plateau ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington, with little areas over the Washington state border in Idaho. This ecoregion stretches across a wide swath of the Columbia River Basin from the Dalles, Oregon to Lewiston, Idaho to Okanogan, Washington near the Canadian border. It incorporates nearly 500 miles of the Columbia River, as well as the lower reaches of major tributaries....

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

Meltwater
2009-07-06 17:15:30

Meltwater is water that is released from melting snow or ice. This includes meltwater from glacial ice and ice shelves over oceans. Meltwater is often produced during volcanic eruptions, and can cause dangerous lahars (landslides of wet volcanic debris). When meltwater pools on the surface rather than draining or flowing away, it forms pools known as melt ponds. Meltwater will often refreeze as the temperature drops. Meltwater can also collect or melt under the ice's surface. Sub-glacial...

More Articles (3 articles) »
Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin