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Latest Glaciology Stories

80-Year-Old Photos Aid In Greenland Ice Melt Study
2012-05-30 09:11:47

Researchers from Denmark´s University of Copenhagen have gained new insight into the loss of ice mass in Greenland´s glaciers thanks to a chance discovery of 80-year-old photo plates discovered in a Danish basement. It is often difficult for scientists to assess the scale and speed of Arctic ice melt, but the extremely rare photos provide them with a more accurate picture. Greenland´s ice was rapidly melting in the 1930s, followed by a cooling period in middle of the 20th...

2012-05-21 09:42:48

Using statistical tool, researchers are able to track where the melting that contributes to sea level rise happens It was used to help Apollo astronauts navigate in space, and has since been applied to problems as diverse as economics and weather forecasting, but Harvard scientists are now using a powerful statistical tool to not only track sea level rise over time, but to determine where the water causing the rise is coming from. As described in an April 23 paper in the Proceedings of...

Antarctic Octopus Provides Clues To Ice Sheet Collapse
2012-05-10 08:34:34

Brett Smith for Redorbit.com A joint team of UK and Australian researchers has found that two separate groups of Antarctic octopuses, from the Ross and Weddell seas on different sides of the continent, are almost genetically identical. This suggests that the two seas, which are now separated by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, were once joined together, possibly a result of the partial collapse of the continental ice sheet. Researchers analyzed the genes of 450 Turquet's octopuses...

Was Little Ice Age Caused By Increased Volcanism In The Middle Ages?
2012-05-10 08:19:09

A large part of the Northern Hemisphere was in the midst of an unusual cold snap for nearly 500 years, from the Middle Ages through the early 19th century, in what scientists now call the “Little Ice Age.” A new study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, has probed the longstanding mystery of when this event actually began, what caused it and how it was sustained for such a long period. Gifford Miller, a climatologist at the University of Colorado at...

Antarctica Ice Sheet May Begin Melting Rapidly By Century's End
2012-05-09 13:58:16

Scientists report in the journal Nature that an Antarctic ice sheet may start to melt rapidly in this century. The finding, made by climate researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association, refute a widely believed theory that ice shelves in the Weddell Sea would not be affected by global warming due to the peripheral location of the sea. "The Weddell Sea was not really on the screen because we all thought that unlike the Amundsen...

2012-05-04 09:14:10

Deep sediments are unparalleled record of biotic changes over past 200,000+ years University of California, Berkeley, scientists are drilling into ancient sediments at the bottom of Northern California's Clear Lake for clues that could help them better predict how today's plants and animals will adapt to climate change and increasing population. The lake sediments are among the world's oldest, containing records of biological change stretching back as far as 500,000 years. The core...

Greenland Glacier Acceleration Levels Less Than Originally Feared
2012-05-04 06:55:11

Some of Greenland's glaciers are moving approximately 30% faster than they were a decade ago, contributing to the rising sea level but not reaching worst-case speed levels that experts once feared, a new study published in Friday's edition of the journal Science has discovered. According to Reuters reporter Deborah Zabarenko, researchers at the University of Washington (UW) and Ohio State University (OSU) studied satellite data from 2000 to 2011. They focused on more than 200 glaciers and...

Caltech Researchers Use Stalagmites To Study Past Climate Change
2012-05-04 05:39:29

There is an old trick for remembering the difference between stalactites and stalagmites in a cave: Stalactites hold tight to the ceiling while stalagmites might one day grow to reach the ceiling. Now, it seems, stalagmites might also fill a hole in our understanding of Earth's climate system and how that system is likely to respond to the rapid increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since preindustrial times. Many existing historical climate records are biased to the high latitudes–...

Image 1 - Warm Ocean Currents Cause Ice Loss In Antarctica
2012-04-26 04:55:01

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com [ Watch the Video ] An international team of scientists reported in the journal Nature on Thursday that warm ocean currents are the culprit behind recent ice loss in Antarctica. The team, lead by British Antarctic Survey, used 4.5 million measurements made by a laser instrument mounted on NASA's ICESat satellite to map the changing thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves. Of the 54 ice shelves they mapped, they revealed that 20 are melting...


Latest Glaciology Reference Libraries

Columbia Plateau
2013-04-19 16:35:47

The Columbia Plateau ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington, with little areas over the Washington state border in Idaho. This ecoregion stretches across a wide swath of the Columbia River Basin from the Dalles, Oregon to Lewiston, Idaho to Okanogan, Washington near the Canadian border. It incorporates nearly 500 miles of the Columbia River, as well as the lower reaches of major tributaries....

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

Meltwater
2009-07-06 17:15:30

Meltwater is water that is released from melting snow or ice. This includes meltwater from glacial ice and ice shelves over oceans. Meltwater is often produced during volcanic eruptions, and can cause dangerous lahars (landslides of wet volcanic debris). When meltwater pools on the surface rather than draining or flowing away, it forms pools known as melt ponds. Meltwater will often refreeze as the temperature drops. Meltwater can also collect or melt under the ice's surface. Sub-glacial...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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