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Latest Glass transition Stories

Firing Temperature Determines Whether Glass Will Bend Or Break
2013-02-28 16:24:11

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers have found a way to determine whether glass will be brittle, or will have the ability to bend without breaking. The team wrote in the journal Nature Communications about how they've identified a temperature that allows you to determine whether you will be forming a brittle piece of glass, or ductile, which refers to a piece of glass' toughness. There is a temperature at which glass can become too viscous for...

Making Glass Stronger With Nanotechnology
2012-09-25 09:51:24

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Glass is everywhere in our lives. From windows to phone screens to building materials, glass permeates our lives. Scientists who look at the structure of glass strictly by the numbers, however, think that some of the newest methods of microelectronics and nanotechnology could produce glass with twice the strength of what is currently available. A new study from Rice University, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

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2011-06-20 08:29:38

Glass, by definition, is amorphous; its atoms lack order and are arranged every which way. But when scientists squeezed tiny samples of a metallic glass under high pressure, they got a surprise: The atoms lined up in a regular pattern to form a single crystal. It's the first time researchers have glimpsed this hidden property in a glass. The discovery, reported June 17th in Science, offers a new window into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which have been used for...

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2011-06-16 07:40:03

Using high-resolution imaging technology, University of Illinois researchers have answered a question that had confounded semiconductor researchers: Is amorphous silicon a glass? The answer? Yes "“ until hydrogen is added. Led by chemistry professor Martin Gruebele, the group published its results in the journal Physical Review Letters. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is a semiconductor popular for many device applications because it is inexpensive and can be created in a flexible thin film,...

2011-04-27 13:25:32

Manufacturers who design new materials often struggle to understand viscous liquids at a molecular scale. Many substances including polymers and biological materials change upon cooling from a watery state at elevated temperatures to a tar-like consistency at intermediate temperatures, then become a solid "glass" similar to hard candy at lower temperatures. Scientists have long sought a molecular-level description of this theoretically mysterious, yet common, "glass transition" process as an...

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2011-02-22 09:46:06

Harvard-led research advances understanding of wound healing, cancer metastasis, and embryonic development By studying cellular movements at the level of both the individual cell and the collective group, applied physicists have discovered that migrating tissues flow very much like colloidal glass. The research, led by investigators at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the University of Florida, advances scientists' understanding of wound healing, cancer...

2010-11-30 15:15:47

Glass is something we all know about. It's what we sip our drinks from, what we look out of to see what the weather is like before going outside and it is the backbone to our high speed communications infrastructure (optical fibers). But what most people don't know is that "glass transitions," where changes in structure of a substance accompanying temperature change get "frozen in," can show up during cooling of most any material, liquids through metals. This produces "glassy states," of that...

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2010-03-22 13:53:50

The National Science Foundation has awarded $1.65 million to a project led by Washington University in St. Louis physicist Ken Kelton to build an electrostatic levitation chamber that will be installed at the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oakridge National Laboratory. Using neutrons as a probe, the instrument will allow scientists to watch atoms in a suspended drop of liquid as the drop cools and solidifies. Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences and chair...

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2008-11-05 10:17:10

Could life have started in a lump of ice? The universe is full of water, mostly in the form of very cold ice films deposited on interstellar dust particles, but until recently little was known about the detailed small scale structure. Now the latest quick freezing techniques coupled with sophisticated scanning electron microscopy techniques, are allowing physicists to create ice films in cold conditions similar to outer space and observe the detailed molecular organization, yielding clues to...

2008-07-18 03:00:48

By Bourne, N K Millett, J C F It is increasingly important to understand the dynamic response of polymers and polymer composites as their engineering application increases. This work aims to investigate the effects of additions to thermoplastic carbon chains on the response of the resulting polymer at the continuum scale. Polyethylene, polyvinyldichloride, and polymethylmethacrylate are shocked, and their equation of state and strength properties is presented. An explanation is sought for...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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