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Latest Glial cells Stories

2014-09-26 12:23:14

CINCINNATI, Sept. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research shows that disrupting the molecular function of a tumor suppressor causes improper formation of a protective insulating sheath on peripheral nerves - leading to neuropathy and muscle wasting in mice similar to that in human diabetes and neurodegeneration. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20110406/MM79025LOGO Scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings online Sept. 26 in...

2014-07-30 10:23:14

Salk Institute Salk scientists show that the little-known supportive cells are vital in cognitive function When you're expecting something—like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant—or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. These waves are called gamma oscillations and they reflect a symphony of cells—both excitatory and inhibitory—playing together in an orchestrated way. Though their role has been debated, gamma waves...

2014-07-09 11:17:04

NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke NIH-funded researchers find brain tumor cells disrupt the brain's protective barrier, offering potential avenues for therapy Invading glioblastoma cells may hijack cerebral blood vessels during early stages of disease progression and damage the brain's protective barrier, a study in mice indicates. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these...

2014-06-25 10:25:31

Ohio State University Study in mice suggests immune cells fail to activate key messenger needed for repair In the complex environment of a spinal cord injury, researchers have found that immune cells in the central nervous system of elderly mice fail to activate an important signaling pathway, dramatically lowering chances for repair after injury. These studies were the first to show that spinal cord injuries are more severe in elderly mice than in young adults, corroborating...

2014-03-31 13:37:12

UCLA study discovers potassium boost improves walking in mouse model Tweaking a specific cell type's ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, reports a UCLA study published March 30 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans. Huntington's disease is passed from parent to child...

Chronic Stress Can Lead To Mental Illness
2014-02-12 08:56:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Chronic stress generates long-term changes in the brain, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. These changes may explain why people suffering from chronic stress are prone to mental problems such as anxiety and mood disorders. The findings, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, might lead to new therapies to reduce the risk of developing mental illness after stressful events. Robert Sanders...

Technology Developed To Regenerate Functional Neurons
2013-12-19 12:28:31

Penn State Researchers at Penn State University have developed an innovative technology to regenerate functional neurons after brain injury, and also in model systems used for research on Alzheimer's disease. The scientists have used supporting cells of the central nervous system, glial cells, to regenerate healthy, functional neurons, which are critical for transmitting signals in the brain. Gong Chen, a professor of biology, the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State,...

Scientists Film Early Concussion Damage And Describe Brain's Response To Injury
2013-12-09 13:29:47

[ Watch the Video: Concussion Secrets Unveiled with Dr. Dorian McGavern ] NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke There is more than meets the eye following even a mild traumatic brain injury. While the brain may appear to be intact, new findings reported in Nature suggest that the brain's protective coverings may feel the brunt of the impact. Using a newly developed mouse trauma model, senior author Dorian McGavern, Ph.D., scientist at the National...

2013-11-25 16:45:57

After Schwann cells (SCs), the principal cells in the peripheral nervous system, and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), cells that ensheath the non-myelinated peripheral neurons in the nose, were co-transplanted into laboratory rats with spinal cord injury, researchers in Beijing, China put the rats on a 30 minute per day treadmill training program for ten weeks to determine if the effects of the workouts would benefit aspects of the animals' recovery. The research team, whose results will...

2013-11-25 16:39:32

A new kind of genetic switch can target the activities of just one type of brain cell Mysterious brain cells called microglia are starting to reveal their secrets thanks to research conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science. Until recently, most of the glory in brain research went to neurons. For more than a century, these electrically excitable cells were believed to perform the entirety of the information processing that makes the brain such an amazing machine. In contrast, cells...


Word of the Day
maffling
  • To stammer.
  • Present participle of maffle, to stammer.
  • A simpleton.
The word 'maffle' may come from a Dutch word meaning 'to move the jaws' or a French word meaning 'having large cheeks'.