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Latest Gonzales v. Raich Stories

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2007-04-17 06:00:00

By Stephanie Armour On a typical weekday, stockbroker Irvin Rosenfeld has a marijuana cigarette before work, then goes to his firm's smoking area for another after he gets to the office. By day's end, he usually has smoked more than a half-dozen joints -- and handled millions of dollars' in clients' holdings. There's nothing illegal about it. Rosenfeld, 54, of Fort Lauderdale, has a condition that causes benign tumors in the long bones of his body. After trying to control pain by taking...

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2005-06-08 07:01:16

Debate hinges on whether data backs use of cannabis for pain relief Before becoming the medical consultant to the Hospice Foundation of America, Dr. William M. Lamers worked for three decades with terminally ill cancer patients, helping to ease their pain. When asked for his opinion on Monday's 6-3 U.S. Supreme Court decision supporting a nationwide ban on medicinal marijuana, he didn't mince words. "I think it's a tragedy that a drug that's apparently safe and is effective as an analgesic, a...

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2005-06-07 07:15:00

WASHINGTON -- Anyone who lights up a joint for medicinal purposes isn't likely to be pursued by federal authorities, despite a Supreme Court ruling that these marijuana users could face federal charges, people on both sides of the issue say. In a 6-3 decision, the court on Monday said those who smoke marijuana because their doctors recommend it to ease pain can be prosecuted for violating federal drug laws, overriding medical marijuana statutes in 10 states. While the justices...

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2005-06-06 10:15:00

WASHINGTON -- Federal authorities may prosecute sick people whose doctors prescribe marijuana to ease pain, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, concluding that state laws don't protect users from a federal ban on the drug. The decision is a stinging defeat for marijuana advocates who had successfully pushed 10 states to allow the drug's use to treat various illnesses. Justice John Paul Stevens, writing the 6-3 decision, said that Congress could change the law to allow medical use of marijuana....

2004-12-01 03:00:13

Traditional drugs have done little to help 39-year-old Angel Raich. Beset by ailments that include tumors in her brain, seizures, spasms and nausea, she has been able to find comfort only in the marijuana that is recommended by her doctor. On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that will determine whether Ms. Raich and similar patients in California and 10 other states can continue to use marijuana for medical purposes. At issue is whether states have the right to...

2004-12-01 00:00:08

Nov. 30--WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday appeared unlikely to shield medical marijuana users from federal drug laws, as justices expressed deep reservations about sanctioning even limited use of illegal drugs. Some justices were skeptical that medicinal pot, which is permitted in 11 states, is always a non-economic enterprise and separate from the illegal drug trade. Others seemed to dispute the idea that Congress could not regulate a substance that is considered contraband....

2004-12-01 00:00:07

The Associated Press WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court questioned whether state medical marijuana laws might be abused by people who aren't really sick as it debated on Monday whether the federal government can prosecute patients who smoke pot on doctors' orders. The stakes are high on both the government level - 11 states have passed medical marijuana laws since 1996 - and the personal. In the courtroom watching the argument was Angel Raich, an Oakland, Calif., mother of two who said she...

2004-11-30 18:00:12

Some patients say the outcome of the case Monday is essentially a matter of life or death. * * * OAKLAND, Calif. - Traditional drugs have done little to help 39-year-old Angel Raich. Beset by a nightmarish list of ailments that includes tumors in her brain and uterus, seizures, spasms and nausea, she has been able to find comfort only in the marijuana that is recommended by her doctor. It eases her pain, allows her to rise out of a wheelchair and promotes an appetite that...

2004-11-30 15:00:11

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday appeared unlikely to shield medical marijuana users from federal drug laws, as justices expressed deep reservations about sanctioning even limited use of illegal drugs. Some justices were skeptical that medicinal pot, which is permitted in 11 states, is always a non-economic enterprise and separate from the illegal drug trade. Others seemed to dispute the idea that Congress could not regulate a substance that is considered contraband. Five justices...

2004-11-30 15:00:10

WASHINGTON -- A lawyer for chronic-pain sufferers argued before the Supreme Court on Monday that these people, upon a doctor's recommendation, should be allowed to smoke marijuana to relieve their suffering. The justices treated the argument skeptically, appearing more receptive to a federal attorney who said that permitting an unapproved, medicinal use for marijuana would defeat Congress' goal of stifling the illegal drug trade. It is "a bit optimistic" to believe that marijuana can be...