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Latest Grain boundary Stories

New research Shows 'Perfect Twin Boundaries' Are Not So Perfect
2013-05-20 10:55:02

One of the basic principles of nanotechnology is that when you make things extremely small—one nanometer is about five atoms wide, 100,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair—they are going to become more perfect.

2012-12-17 14:24:54

A new material structure predicted at Rice University offers the tantalizing possibility of a signal path smaller than the nanowires for advanced electronics now under development at Rice and elsewhere.

2010-11-12 01:42:59

The website of the Nobel Prize shows a cat resting in a graphene hammock.

2010-03-26 09:04:15

Self-repairing materials within nuclear reactors may one day become a reality as a result of research by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists.

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2010-02-23 16:00:00

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that, under the right conditions, newly developed nanocrystalline materials exhibit surprising activity in the tiny spaces between the geometric clusters of atoms called nanocrystals from which they are made.

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2009-06-17 14:40:00

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered that a reduction in mechanical strain at the boundaries of crystal grains can significantly improve the performance of high-temperature superconductors (HTS).

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2009-06-17 13:15:00

Better predictions of how many valuable materials behave under stress could be on the way from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

2008-10-07 03:00:18

By Zhang, X Anderoglu, O; Hoagland, R G; Misra, A This article reviews recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered copper and 330 stainless-steel films with {111} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction.


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.