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Latest Grasshopper Stories

Grammy Winner Has Newly Discovered Species Of Grasshopper Named After Her
2014-05-09 03:31:31

University of Central Florida A newly discovered grasshopper by University of Central Florida scientists now bears the name of Grammy-award winning singer and activist Ana Lila Downs Sanchez. The scientists named the new species discovered on the side of a mountain road near Oaxaca, Mexico, after the Mexican-American singer as a nod to her efforts to preserve indigenous culture and penchant for wearing colorful, local costumes as part of her performances. "It was primarily Paolo's...

Extracting Plant DNA From Grasshopper Guts Improves Understanding Of Plant-insect Interactions
2014-02-06 14:12:58

[ Watch the Video: Demonstration of Grasshopper Dissection ] American Journal of Botany Grasshoppers may be small, but the damages they are causing to the US agriculture industry are anything but. Every year, they feed on crops and on rangelands needed for raising livestock, costing landowners millions of dollars. Although they pose a major threat, grasshopper populations play a positive role in cycling nutrients from decomposing plant matter back into the soil. A new method to...

How Did The Desert Locust Lose Its Memory?
2014-01-14 10:59:40

Ciência Viva The desert locust (a type of grasshopper), much like Dr Jekyll/Mr Hyde, goes from being an innocuous solitary-living individual to become a voracious gregarious animal that destroys everything on its path (and back). These two very different “personas” are remarkable adaptations of a single genome to distinct environments. But apparently, this flexibility is even more impressive says Patricio Simōes, Jeremy Niven and Swidbert Ott from the Champalimaud Neuroscience...

The Productivity Of Our Soil Affected From Grasshoppers 'Stressed' By Spiders
2012-06-14 15:58:15

How do grasshoppers who are being frightened by spiders affect our ecosystem? In no small measure, say researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at Yale University in the US. A grasshopper that is in fear of an attacker, such as a spider, will enter a situation of stress and will consume a greater quantity of carbohydrate-rich plants — similar to humans under stress who might eat more sweets. This type of reaction will, in turn, cause chemical changes in the...

Tiny Grasshopper-like Insect Found Roaming Around In Belize
2012-02-16 08:27:52

Entomologists from the University of Illinois have discovered a new species of grasshopper-like insect in the tropical rainforests of Belize, apparently the first of its family to be found, naming it in commemoration of an ancient Mayan people who once lived in the region. The tiny hopper, Ripipteryx mopana, was discovered in the Toledo District in Belize. It was named after a tribe of Mayans known as the Mopan people. R. mopana measures less than 0.2 inches (5mm) long and is the...

2012-01-26 13:44:31

Low protein grasses, land management choices can make insect swarms likely to roam While residents of the United States and much of Europe think of locust plagues as biblical references, locust swarms still have devastating effects on agriculture today, especially in developing countries in Asia and Africa. In a study in the journal Science on Jan. 27, scientists from Arizona State University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences show that insect nutrition and agricultural land management...

Image 1 - Ancient Crickets Hint At The Origins Of Insect Hearing
2012-01-04 04:53:04

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50 million year-old cricket and katydid fossils – sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date– help trace the evolution of the insect ear, says a new study by researchers working at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Insects hear with help from unusual ears, said co-author Roy Plotnick of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Grasshoppers have ears on their abdomens. Lacewings have ears on...

New Insight Into Why Locusts Swarm
2011-12-20 10:33:36

Protein associated with learning implicated in causing grasshoppers to swarm New research has found that a protein associated with learning and memory plays an integral role in changing the behavior of locusts from that of harmless grasshoppers into swarming pests. Desert Locusts are a species of grasshopper that have evolved a Jekyll-and-Hyde disposition to survive in their harsh environment. In their solitary phase, they avoid other locusts and occur in very low density. When the...

2011-11-07 13:00:00

Happy Grasshopper, the automated email marketing system, is celebrating the completion of it's first full year in business. Their unique approach to email marketing is getting outstanding results for users and making them keeping exceptionally happy. Tampa, FL (PRWEB) November 07, 2011 Happy Grasshopper, the automated email marketing system, is celebrating the completion of it's first full year in business. âœWe are having a month long celebration to thank our...

2011-08-02 00:00:30

Happy Grasshopper, the automated keep in touch service for REALTORS®, announced its new Enterprise Plan this week at Inman Real Estate Connect. Designed specifically for brokerages and large groups, Happy Grasshopper now automates keeping-in-touch at scale. Tampa, FL (PRWEB) August 01, 2011 Happy Grasshopper is an automated keep in touch that helps agents build relationships through fun, short email messages created by professional writers. Users simply upload the names and email...


Latest Grasshopper Reference Libraries

Red Locust, Nomadacris septemfasciata
2013-07-10 15:41:21

The red locust (Nomadacris septemfasciata) is a species of grasshopper that is native to Sub-Saharan Africa, where it prefers to swarm moist areas like seasonal floodplains. It can be found in areas with grain, its main food source, and areas with some tree cover. Adults are typically brownish-tan in color and can reach an average body length between 2.4 and 3.3 inches depending upon the sex, with females growing larger. Young individuals of this species can vary in color depending upon which...

40_94cea10bb8467a49d1969ecb176c964a
2005-09-07 20:39:31

Caelifera, a herbivorous insect, is a suborder of the order Orthoptera. Commonly called grasshoppers in English, the sub-order includes short-horned grasshoppers, grasshoppers and locusts. Characteristics The Caelifera have antennae that are shorter than the body, and short ovipositors. Those species that make easily heard noises usually do so by rubbing the hind femurs against the forewings or abdomen, or by snapping the wings in flight. Tympana, if present, are on the sides of the...

0_3aacb3c5a030a33a1072fa539051707d
2005-09-07 18:59:19

Katydid is the common name of insects belonging to the grasshopper family Tettigoniidae, which contains over 6,800 species. Katydid are also known as "long horned grasshoppers" and "bush crickets." The term "katydid" is used mainly in the U.S., Canada, and Australia. The name "katydid" comes from the sound produced by species of the N. American genus Pterophylla (literally "winged leaf"). The males of katydids have sound-producing (stridulating) organs located on their front wings which in...

40_679a7120a90bc3449a6ecb669210fe98
2005-08-25 09:40:19

The Orthoptera are an order of insects with incomplete metamorphosis, including the grasshoppers, crickets, locusts, and katydids. Many insects in this order produce sound (known as stridulation) by rubbing their wings against each other or their legs, the wings or legs containing rows of corrugated bumps. Their ears, located in the front legs, are interconnected in such a way that they are able to locate each other by sound. Characteristics Orthopterans have two pairs of wings - the...

0_80b600c3cd3494e8a4c494affbdaba4d
2005-07-13 16:57:18

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae. Crickets are known for the loud chirping noises they make by rubbing their wings together. Only male crickets sing as the male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" that produces a song that is species specific. Interestingly in 1970, Dr. William H. Cade discovered that the parasitic fly Ormia...

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Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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