Quantcast

Gray Wolf Reference Libraries

Page 2 of about 19 Articles
Raccoon Dog
2007-01-22 14:37:55

The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a member of the canidae family (which includes dogs, wolves, and foxes) and is indigenous to East Asia. It is not a true dog, and is the only species in its genus Nyctereutes. It is named for its superficial resemblance to the non-canidae raccoon. The animal carries historical and cultural significance in Japan. Raccoon dogs are native to Japan,...

African Wild Dog
2007-01-21 20:21:17

The African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus, also known as the African Hunting Dog Cape Hunting Dog, or Painted Hunting Dog, is a mammal of the Canidae family. It is related to the domestic dog. It is the only species in the canid family to lack dewclaws on the forelimbs. They are, as their name indicates, found only in Africa. They are found especially in scrub savanna and other lightly wooded...

Black-backed Jackal
2007-01-21 20:07:57

Appearance The black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas) is an African canine with a fox-like appearance. It has tan fur, and a thick stripe of black and silver running down its back. They weigh anywhere from 15 to 30 pounds and are 5.91 to 11.81 in (15 to 30 cm) at the shoulder. Males are usually larger than females. Behavior Black-backed Jackals usually live together in pairs that last...

Ethiopian Wolf
2007-01-21 19:54:04

The Ethiopian Wolf is also known as the "Abyssinian Wolf", "Red Jackal" or "Fox", "Simen/Simenian/Simian/Simien Fox or Jackal" and "Horse's Jackal" in English. The Ethiopian wolf is one of the most rare and most endangered of all canids. The numerous names reflect previous uncertainty about their taxonomic position, but they are thought to the wolves of the genus Canis rather than the foxes...

Red Wolf
2007-01-21 19:52:21

The red wolf, Canis rufus is the most rare and most endangered of all wolves. It is thought that its original distribution included much of eastern North America. Red wolves were found from Pennsylvania in the east, Florida in the south, and Texas in the west. On the basis of further study, its historic range is now thought to have extended further north into the northeastern USA and extreme...

Dog
2007-01-21 19:39:25

The dog is a type of canid, a mammal in the order Carnivora. The term includes both wild (feral) and domestic variants, but commonly excludes other canids such as wolves. Over time, the dog has developed into hundreds of breeds with a great degree of variation. Intelligence Among dog lovers, dogs are generally valued for their intelligence. Both anecdotal evidence and scientific...

Gray Wolf
2007-01-21 19:37:02

The gray wolf also known as timber wolf or wolf is a mammal in the order Carnivora. The gray wolf shares a common ancestry with the domestic dog. Gray wolves were once abundant and distributed over much of North America, Eurasia, and the Middle East. Today, for a variety of human-related reasons including widespread habitat destruction and excessive hunting, wolves inhabit only a very limited...

Coyote
2007-01-21 19:28:01

The coyote is a member of the Canidae (dog) family and a close relative of the domestic dog. Coyotes are native to North America and are only found from Canada south to Costa Rica. European explorers first encountered these canines during their travels in the American Southwest. They may occasionally assemble in small packs, but naturally hunt alone. Coyotes live an average of about 6 to 10...

Bengal Tiger
2007-01-19 14:24:56

The Bengal tiger or Royal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is a subspecies of tiger found in parts of India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Myanmar. It is the most common tiger subspecies, and lives in a variety of habitats. It lives in grasslands, subtropical and tropical rainforests, scrub forests, wet and dry deciduous forests and mangroves. Its fur is orange-brown with black stripes,...

Word of the Day
edulcoration
  • The act of sweetening by admixture of some saccharine substance.
The word 'edulcoration' comes from a Latin word meaning 'making sweet'.