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Latest Grazing Stories

grassland in the Flint Hills
2014-08-04 02:00:31

Greg Tammen, Kansas State University Kansas State University researchers have completed a 20-year study that looks at the consequences of burning Flint Hills prairie at different times of the year. It finds that burning outside of the current late spring time frame has no measurable negative consequences for the prairie and, in fact, may have multiple benefits. The study was conducted by Gene Towne, research associate and the Konza Prairie Biological Station fire chief, and Joseph...

2014-07-11 08:25:49

DUBLIN, July 11, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Forage Feed Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019" report to their offering. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 Forage consists of grasses, herbaceous legumes, tree legumes, silage, green feed and hay. Nearly 200 plant species have been known as forage crops. The market for forage is segmented as fresh forage and stored forage....

2014-06-19 00:21:41

CHICAGO, June 19, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Cloud Foundation and Wild Horse Freedom Federation today released BLM livestock data for Beaver County and Iron County, Utah showing that despite a chorus of demands from ranchers for the removal of wild horses from the over-grazed range; the data shows livestock outnumber wild horses 10.6:1 in these areas. "It is irresponsible and false for Iron County commissioners or anyone to claim that the wild horses in that area are having...

2014-06-16 23:00:32

An article featured in Rangelands discusses the practice of patch-burning and compares this technique to that of more traditional methods. However, after conducting a 3-year study, the authors concluded that there was no statistical difference in the cattles' body condition score (BCS) when measuring the patch-burning method against the traditional grazing methods. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) June 16, 2014 To keep order on rangelands, range managers must carefully monitor the grazing...

2014-05-09 08:28:10

DUBLIN, May 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zkltwn/forage_feed) has announced the addition of the "Forage Feed Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019" report to their offering. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 Forage consists of grasses, herbaceous legumes, tree legumes, silage, green feed and hay. Nearly 200 plant species have been known as forage crops. The market...

2014-04-22 12:32:53

How ranches safeguard California's natural environments SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Tim Koopmann is every bit as protective of the endangered California tiger salamander that live on his 850-acre ranch in Sunol as he is of the cattle. Scott Stone is a loyal steward of thousands of acres of native grasslands and riparian habitats he helped restore on his beef ranch in Yolo County. Jack Varian is a fierce guardian of the water that runs over his V6...

Grazing Animals May Protect Biodiversity In Over-Fertilized Grasslands
2014-03-11 09:34:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Nutrient Network has released a new, comparative study of grasslands on six continents, to be published in an upcoming issue of Nature, that suggests it might be possible to counteract the human-made overdose of fertilizer that threatens to permanently alter the biodiversity of the world's native prairies. The key finding of this study, carried out at 40 sites globally, is simple: let grazing animals crop the excess growth of...

2014-03-10 23:23:10

A study of grasslands on six continents suggests a way to counteract the human-made overdose of fertilizer that threatens to permanently reduce their biodiversity: let grazing animals crop fast growing grasses. Grazers allow sunlight to reach ground level, encouraging other plants' growth, according to the study published online March 9, 2014 in Nature. College Park, MD (PRWEB) March 10, 2014 A comparative study of grasslands on six continents suggests there may be a way to counteract...

Butterfly Populations Might Be Saved By Land Management
2013-11-18 17:33:04

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Butterfly populations across the world are in the decline, and researchers say that land management could be the key to counteracting the pattern. Researchers from Sweden and Germany writing in the journal Nature Conservation reviewed effects of land management on butterfly diversity using historical and current surveys over the past 100 years. The study focused on systematic surveys of butterfly population trends and extinction...

What Cattle Eat Affects Their Weight And Tastiness Of The Meat
2013-09-19 11:21:25

Clemson University Cattle are what they eat. The forage — grasses and other plants ­— beef cattle eat affects the nutrition and tastiness of the meat. Clemson University animal science researchers report that steers grazing on one of five forages kept in paddocks showed significant differences in growth, carcass and meat quality. The research can help cattle producers with alternatives to corn and feed when they are looking to add weight and value to their animals prior to sale....


Latest Grazing Reference Libraries

Hill farming
2013-09-20 13:07:03

Hill farming involves using is a particular piece of land for grazing sheep and cattle. This form of farming is used particularly by the farmers of the UK in the higher elevations. Farmers generally do not have access to winter fodder for their cattle, therefore, sheep farms are typical for such areas. Due to this restricted access, farmers move the herds to lower elevations for feeding. These specific farms are found in the North and South-Western areas of England, as well as the...

Hill Farming
2013-08-05 10:40:24

Hill farming is a particular piece of land for grazing sheep and cattle. This form of farming is used particularly by the farmers of the UK in the higher elevations. Farmers do not have access to winter fodder for the cattle; therefore, sheep farms are typical for such areas. Due to this restricted access, farmers move the herds to lower elevations for feeding. These specific farms are found in the North and South-Western areas of England, as well as the highlands of Scotland. The harsh...

Overgrazing
2013-04-01 12:31:24

Overgrazing occurs when plants are unprotected to intensive grazing for extended periods of time, or without enough recovery periods. It can be a result of either livestock in poorly managed agricultural applications, or by overpopulations of native or non-native wild animals. Overgrazing reduces the usefulness, biodiversity, and productivity of the land and is one cause of desertification and erosion. It’s also considered to be a cause of the spread of invasive species of non-native...

Black-tailed Prairie Dog, Cynomys ludovicianus
2012-07-25 06:59:18

The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is native to the United States, occurring in the Great Plains to both the border of Canada and Mexico. Its range includes areas in Mexico, but no longer includes Arizona. This species was one of two prairie dog species to be described by Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition. It prefers a habitat within grasslands, but their habitat choices do depend on soil type, rainfall, slope angles, and vegetation cover. The black-tailed prairie...

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Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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