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Latest Grazing Stories

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2010-09-11 08:10:00

Climate change may be combated by changing the diet of livestock, whose farting and manure, along with the feed crops produced, contribute to 18 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study.The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), which conducted the study, said as the growing global demand for meat and milk surges it recommends simple steps to curb livestock-related greenhouse gas emissions. ILRI recommended using more nutritious grasses,...

2010-07-08 11:42:00

See this family on new YouTube video! SACAMENTO, Calif., July 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Tim Koopmann and his family were honored in June at the annual fundraiser for the California Rangeland Trust with the third annual Conservationist of the Year Award for their life-long commitment to ranching, the environment and rangeland conservation. Tim, his wife Melinda and children Clayton and Carrisa, operate a family-run beef cattle ranch in Sunol, a small community in Alameda County. They...

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2010-07-07 07:47:19

Deworming lambs can be minimized with rotational grazing and checking the animals' eye color, according to an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) study. Animal scientist Joan Burke at the ARS Dale Bumpers Small Farms Research Center in Booneville, Ark., and colleagues made this finding as part of a continuing collaboration with scientists, veterinarians, and extension agents from the Southern Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control. The consortium was formed in response to the threats...

2010-06-21 20:45:30

Keeping livestock away from poisonous locoweed during seasons when it's a forage favorite is one way ranchers can protect their animals and their profits, according to a 20-year collaboration by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their university partners. The ARS researchers teamed up with New Mexico State University (NMSU) scientists to study locoweed poisoning in U.S. livestock and devise ways to minimize or prevent losses. When livestock graze on locoweed, the plant's...

2010-04-30 12:52:37

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Burns, Ore., are taking a careful look at how grazing cattle affect sage-grouse habitat on high desert rangelands. Cattle share this habitat with sage-grouse, which are chicken-sized birds that are notorious for the showy commotion they create during mating season. But the sage-grouse numbers have declined throughout their range, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has added the...

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2010-04-29 08:19:06

A weed calculator developed by an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist tells ranchers the number of additional cows they could raise if they eliminated one or two widespread exotic invasive weeds. Rangeland ecologist Matt Rinella at the ARS Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Mont., created a computer model that predicts weed impacts on forage production. Data for developing the model came from 30 weed researchers working throughout the western United...

2010-03-05 12:51:36

AgriLife Research ecologist: Careful management is the key The application of summer patch burning to heal native rangeland may be best accomplished using rotational grazing, according to a Texas AgriLife Research range ecologist. Dr. Richard Teague recently completed a study of native rangeland vegetation and soils subjected to summer patch burns followed by cattle being allowed to graze either continuously or using a rotational grazing system. Prescribed summer fire as a management tool is...

2010-03-04 11:28:00

COLLEGE STATION "“ A new study by Texas AgriLife Research scientists finds that contrary to widespread perceptions, springs in the Edwards Plateau, which provide much of the stream flows, have not been declining as a result of increased encroachment of woody plants. In fact, spring flows are twice as high as they were prior to 1950. The study found that the landscape is actually recovering from intensive livestock grazing in Texas that dates back to the late 1800s. Large numbers of...

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2010-03-03 13:38:25

Lots of leaves growing in easy reach of a cow's tongue means less time and less land needed to raise beef cattle, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and DairyNZ (New Zealand) scientists. Ranchers may be able to tell how long to leave cattle in a pasture, and how large to make the pasture, by the height and leafiness of plants growing there, according to Stacey Gunter, research leader at the ARS Southern Plains Range Research Station in Woodward, Okla. He worked with former Ph.D....

2010-01-05 20:59:39

AgriLife Research: Management practice sustainable and productive alternatives Short grazing periods on multiple paddocks within a pasture can not only restore forage conditions, but also profit margins, according to a Texas AgriLife Research scientist. Dr. Richard Teague, AgriLife Research range ecologist in Vernon, has been studying the benefits of multi-paddock grazing for the past eight years. Ranchers need to know answers to practical questions such as: how good is this management...


Latest Grazing Reference Libraries

Hill farming
2013-09-20 13:07:03

Hill farming involves using is a particular piece of land for grazing sheep and cattle. This form of farming is used particularly by the farmers of the UK in the higher elevations. Farmers generally do not have access to winter fodder for their cattle, therefore, sheep farms are typical for such areas. Due to this restricted access, farmers move the herds to lower elevations for feeding. These specific farms are found in the North and South-Western areas of England, as well as the...

Hill Farming
2013-08-05 10:40:24

Hill farming is a particular piece of land for grazing sheep and cattle. This form of farming is used particularly by the farmers of the UK in the higher elevations. Farmers do not have access to winter fodder for the cattle; therefore, sheep farms are typical for such areas. Due to this restricted access, farmers move the herds to lower elevations for feeding. These specific farms are found in the North and South-Western areas of England, as well as the highlands of Scotland. The harsh...

Overgrazing
2013-04-01 12:31:24

Overgrazing occurs when plants are unprotected to intensive grazing for extended periods of time, or without enough recovery periods. It can be a result of either livestock in poorly managed agricultural applications, or by overpopulations of native or non-native wild animals. Overgrazing reduces the usefulness, biodiversity, and productivity of the land and is one cause of desertification and erosion. It’s also considered to be a cause of the spread of invasive species of non-native...

Black-tailed Prairie Dog, Cynomys ludovicianus
2012-07-25 06:59:18

The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is native to the United States, occurring in the Great Plains to both the border of Canada and Mexico. Its range includes areas in Mexico, but no longer includes Arizona. This species was one of two prairie dog species to be described by Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition. It prefers a habitat within grasslands, but their habitat choices do depend on soil type, rainfall, slope angles, and vegetation cover. The black-tailed prairie...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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