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Latest Great Apes Stories

chimpanzee in Rwandan forest
2014-06-19 03:00:26

Trinity College Dublin Light-fingered chimpanzees are changing the way subsistence farmers make a living in Africa by causing them to grow different crops and spend more time guarding their goods. This is according to work performed by researchers from Trinity College Dublin’s Department of Geography in the School of Natural Sciences, who say that communities near the edge of tropical forests are experiencing a lack of ‘dietary diversity’ and an increased exposure to disease-carrying...

US Fish And Wildlife Service Looks To Give Chimpanzees Greater Protection
2013-06-12 10:38:37

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Even though chimpanzees are commonly seen in films, television shows, circuses, and at the zoo — the great apes are considered endangered and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is proposing a new rule that would give greater protection to our fellow primates. “I was so pleased to hear about the proposed rule,” said renowned primate expert Jane Goodall in response to the FWS proposal. “This is exceptional...

Human Hands Evolved For Fighting And Punching
2012-12-20 10:48:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The human hand is unique in the animal kingdom. As we evolved from apes, it was one of the most distinctive features that truly distinguished us from our closest living relatives. But while we know our hands can allow us to do many things, such as play music, make art, and easily grasp and manipulate tools, they have actually evolved for a vastly different reason, according to new research. That research, conducted by the...

Mid-Life Crisis Found To Affect Apes Too
2012-11-20 05:10:31

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Apes, like humans, experience a decline in happiness during middle age, which rebounds as they approach old age, according to a new study that suggests the infamous mid-life crisis may have biological, rather than sociological, roots. Humans across many cultures report a dip in happiness during their late-40s when compared with their life satisfaction during younger and older years. In the current study, an international team...

2010-03-15 15:56:06

When we notice somebody pointing at something, we automatically look in the direction of the gesture. In humans, the ability to understand this type of gesturing (known as declarative communication) may seem to be an automatic response, but it is actually a sign of sophisticated communication behavior. Numerous studies have tried to determine if great apes (for example, chimpanzees and bonobos) are able to understand declarative communication, but results have been mixed. Psychological...

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2009-06-04 15:10:00

When researchers set out to study the origins of human laughter, some gorillas and chimps were literally tickled to assist. The scientists tickled 22 young orangutans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and bonobos, as well as three human infants, then acoustically analyzed the laughing sounds they produced.  The results led researchers to conclude that people and great apes inherited laughter from a common ancestor that lived more than 10 million years ago. Although the vocalizations varied, the...

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2009-03-31 08:34:15

February's brutal chimpanzee attack, during which a pet chimp inflicted devastating injuries on a Connecticut woman, was a stark reminder that chimps are much stronger than humans"”as much as four-times stronger, some researchers believe. But what is it that makes our closest primate cousins so much stronger than we are? One possible explanation is that great apes simply have more powerful muscles. Indeed, biologists have uncovered differences in muscle architecture between chimpanzees...

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2009-03-19 12:45:35

Scientists in the Republic of Congo used cameras to capture how chimpanzees use "tools" to raid the honey from beehives, BBC News reported. The chimpanzees were able to craft large clubs from branches to beat the beehives until they broke apart, while some chimps would also use a "toolkit" of different wooden tools to secure the honey, researchers said. "The nutritional returns don't seem to be that great. But their excitement when they've succeeded is incredible, you can see how much they...

2008-08-02 21:00:19

Chimpanzees used in medical tests are left with mental problems resembling those exhibited by humans who have undergone torture, a U.S. expert said. A study involving 116 chimpanzees that were used in medical testing revealed 95 percent of them showed behavioral signs similar to those of humans who have post-traumatic stress disorder, the Independent reported Saturday. The Independent said workers at a Louisiana animal center were questioned about chimps' behavior in the survey. The...

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2008-03-14 00:00:00

CHICAGO -- Movie producers and advertisers have long relied on chimpanzees comically dressed as humans to entertain their audience, but scientists say the practice is bad for chimps not only as individuals but also as a species threatened with extinction. Primatologists reported Thursday in the journal Science that only 66 percent of visitors to Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago thought chimps were endangered. Many people surveyed said they assumed that because the apes are so widely used in...


Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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