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Latest Great Barrier Reef Stories

Scientists Use 'Lab-in-a-Box' To Study Coral Reefs
2012-06-08 05:04:39

In what is being called the first controlled ocean acidification experiment ever conducted in shallow coastal waters, an international team of experts has created a miniature laboratory in the Great Barrier Reef in order to simulate anticipated future conditions in the waters of the region's ecosystem. The researchers, including Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Senior Fellows Jeff Koseff, Rob Dunbar and Steve Monismith, created a so-called "lab-in-a-box" in two to six foot deep...

2012-05-31 01:12:17

An international team of scientists has gathered the first conclusive evidence that marine reserves can help restock exploited fish populations on neighboring reefs which are open to both commercial and recreational fishing. The groundbreaking study was carried out in the Keppel Island group on Australia´s Great Barrier Reef by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS), in conjunction with other leading research institutions, and is reported in the...

2012-05-24 21:19:26

Researchers reporting online on May 24 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology present the first evidence that areas closed to all fishing are helping to sustain valuable Australian fisheries. The international team of scientists applied a forensic DNA profiling approach to track the dispersal pathways of fish larvae throughout a network of marine reserves on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. "Marine reserves have been set aside to create resilient ocean ecosystems and help sustain...

2012-05-08 10:50:05

Jobs, livelihoods and ecotourism industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world´s coral reefs, marine researchers say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks, whales, and turtles that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, say researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook...

2012-05-03 09:11:50

Australia´s sea snakes may be more in danger of extinction than previously thought, marine scientists say. New research on turtleheaded sea snakes that frequent coral reefs in Australia and nearby New Caledonia has found they are strongly attached to their home reef and rarely venture even a few kilometers to neighboring reefs. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) and The University of Sydney used genetic ℠fingerprinting´ to show...

2012-04-12 21:05:44

As ocean temperatures rise, some species of corals are likely to succeed at the expense of others, according to a report published online on April 12 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology that details the first large-scale investigation of climate effects on corals. "The good news is that, rather than experiencing wholesale destruction, many coral reefs will survive climate change by changing the mix of coral species as the ocean warms and becomes more acidic," said Terry Hughes of...

2012-04-02 11:18:43

A team of international scientists working in the central Pacific have discovered that coral which has survived heat stress in the past is more likely to survive it in the future. The study, published today in the journal PLoS ONE, paves the way towards an important road map on the impacts of ocean warming, and will help scientists identify the habitats and locations where coral reefs are more likely to adapt to climate change. "We're starting to identify the types of reef environments...

Google Teaming Up With Scientific Survey To Show Off Great Barrier Reef
2012-02-23 14:10:01

Researchers have partnered with Google in an effort to allow anyone with Internet access to take a virtual tour of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The Catlin Seaview Survey announced that it will carry out the first comprehensive study of the composition and health of reef coral to an unprecedented depth range. The project's chief scientists, Ove Hoegh Guldberg, a professor at the University of Queensland, said scientific data gathered would help strengthen the understanding about how...

2012-02-23 13:22:28

More than 300 eminent scientists from 21 other countries around the world today urged the Australian Federal Government to create the world´s largest no-take marine reserve in the Coral Sea. “Marine reserves are an important tool for managing and restoring ecosystems. They protect brood stocks for sustainable fisheries and rebuild distorted foodwebs. We know how well they work because of the differences that we observe again and again between different marine zones under...

2012-02-21 23:14:33

One of the greatest biological threats to tropical coral reefs can be a population outbreak of crown-of-thorns (COT) sea stars (Acanthaster planci). Outbreaks can consume live corals over large areas, a change that can promote algal growth, alter reef fish populations, and reduce the aesthetic value of coral reefs, which in turn negatively affects tourism. Despite more than 30 years of research, the triggers and spread of COT outbreaks are not fully understood. Human impacts such as...


Latest Great Barrier Reef Reference Libraries

Short-spined Crown-of-thorns Starfish, Acanthaster brevispinus
2013-08-12 14:37:20

The short-spined crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster brevispinus) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that includes the Great Barrier Reef, the Philippines, and the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. Because these areas are so far away from one another, the full range of this starfish cannot be known, but it can be said that it resides in a tropical or subtropical environment. It was first discovered by W.K. Fisher, who...

Barrier Reef Anemonefish, Amphiprion akindynos
2012-05-11 12:04:43

The Barrier Reef Anemonefish (Amphiprion akindynos) is native to the marine lagoons and reefs in the Western Pacific Ocean.  It lives at a depth of around eighty-two feet in temperatures fluctuating between fifty degrees Fahrenheit to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Its range includes northern New South Wales, the Loyalty Islands, Tonga, New Caledonia, Coral Sea, and the Great Barrier Reef. They are typically seen near or within the tentacles of their host anemones. They will inhabit anemones like...

720px-Folded_Coral_Flynn_Reef
2012-04-03 14:15:16

Alcyoniidae is a family of leathery corals that occur globally in temperate and tropical seas. These reef dwellers are often found in wave-exposed areas of reef crests, less turbid waters in lagoons, on steep slopes, under overhangs, and at depths of 100 feet and deeper. A colony of leathery coral is stiff, hard, and inflexible. It is composed of tiny polyps projecting from a shared leathery tissue. There are two kinds of polyps seen in Alcyoniidae corals: autozooids have long trunks and...

Elongate Surgeonfish, Acanthurus mata
2012-04-02 17:23:07

The Elongate Surgeonfish, (Acanthurus mata), is a species of tropical fish found in the Indo-Pacific, and can be found as far north as Southern Japan and south to the Great Barrier Reef. Some also live as far west as South Africa and as far east as the Tuamotu Islands. Its main habitat is steep slopes around coral reefs. This is a light blue fish with numerous brown stripes running down the length of the body, although over time it is able to change color to become blue overall. It has a...

Pajama Cardinalfish, Sphaeramia nematoptera
2009-06-19 12:35:41

The Pajama Cardinalfish (Sphaeramia nematoptera) is a fish that belongs to the Apogonidae family. These fish are a popular aquarium fish. The Pajama Cardinalfish can grow to be a length of 3 inches. The fish has red eyes and broad, dark, vertical "waistband" that is sprinkled with red spots that leads toward the tail. This fish has low vulnerability. Pajama Cardinalfish circulate throughout much of the West Pacific, from Jave to Fiji and from south of the Ryukyu Islands to the Great...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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