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Latest Great Horned Owl Stories

5a0f919942ea6527fc2432712c75d79e1
2005-06-23 13:45:00

There's more than meets the human ear when the black-capped chickadee lets its flock mates know a predator is lurking about by giving out its familiar "chick-a-dee-dee-dee" call. The small songbirds, which are common throughout much of North America, use that signature call in a wide variety of social interactions including warning of predators. And it turns out that those alarms are far more subtle and information-packed than scientists previously imagined. Writing in the current issue of...


Latest Great Horned Owl Reference Libraries

American Coot, Fulica americana
2009-07-09 16:35:14

The American coot (Fulica americana) is a member of the Rallidae bird family. This bird makes its home in open bodies of waters and wetlands. The coot can grow to be about 16 inches in length and weight about 1.4 pounds. Adult coots have a white frontal shield that usually has a reddish-brown spot between the eyes by the top of the bill. Its bill is typically short, white, and thick. At the billtip a dark band can be identified up close. The head and neck of the coot is darker than the rest...

38_80ca61f12e83aa691aea3616dd889a76
2006-08-17 16:33:10

The Great Grey Owl or Lapland Owl (Strix nebulosa) is a very large owl. They breed in North America from Lake Superior to the Pacific coast and Alaska, and from Scandinavia across northern Asia. They are permanent residents, but may move south and southeast when food is scarce. A small population, estimated at less than 100 birds, occurs in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Their breeding habitat is dense coniferous forest near open areas, such as meadows or bogs. The Great Grey...

38_3c5ad69b39ca492b8b2a16bb0be19a43
2006-08-17 16:28:05

The Barred Owl (Strix varia) is a large owl. Its breeding habitat is dense woods across Canada, the eastern United States and south to Central America. It is known also as eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl and striped owl, but is best known as the hoot owl. It nests in a tree cavity, sometimes holes that have been used by a crow or squirrel. The adult is 17.5 inches long with a 44 inch wingspan. It has a pale face with dark rings around the eyes, a yellow bill and dark eyes. The under parts...

38_3add34e862213db8b1fa4896182175a4
2006-08-17 16:12:56

The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. It is also known in North America as the Arctic Owl or the Great White Owl. They are normally found in the northern circumpolar regions above latitude 60 degrees north, although due to population fluctuations in its prey species, they have been known to relocate and breed at more southerly latitudes. They have been reported as far south as the American Gulf states, southern Russia, northern China and even the...

30_be2c517e06269278b5cfa02c6367d32e
2005-06-09 11:54:12

The Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) is a very large owl found in wooded or heavily shrubbed areas across North America and parts of South America. They are permanent residents, but may wander after the nesting season. Adults have large ear tufts, a reddish face, a white patch on the throat, and yellow eyes. The ear tufts are not actually ears, but just tufts of fur. The underparts are light with brown barring; the upper parts are mottled brown. The legs and feet are covered in feathers...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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