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Latest Great white shark Stories

2012-08-17 23:02:03

Tracking Jaws - non-profit Ocearch brings Global Shark Tracking to US San Francisco, California (PRWEB) August 17, 2012 With the nation captivated by sharks this week, OCEARCH is preparing to deploy its technology in U.S. waters to solve a 400 million year old mystery of the Great White Sharks in Cape Cod this September. OCEARCH, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, supports leading researchers and institutions obtaining ground breaking data on the health and biology of sharks. They deliver unparalleled...

Conservation Groups Want Protection For California Sharks
2012-08-14 14:24:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the Discovery Channel kicks off its annual Shark Week, conservation groups are petitioning the government to protect the ferocious ocean predators living off the coast of California. Citing a declining population, Oceana, The Center for Biological Diversity, and SharkStewards filed a scientific petition with the National Marine Fisheries Service seeking to protect great white sharks living off the West Coast under the Endangered...

2012-07-24 23:03:12

The first survey conducted before and after a shark attack has found that public support for great white sharks was virtually unchanged. Results following the 2011 shark attack in Cape Town were published online in the academic journal Marine Policy. (PRWEB) July 24, 2012 The first survey conducted before and after a shark attack has found that public support for great white sharks was virtually unchanged. The academic journal Marine Policy published the results online this week in a paper...

Australian Great White Sharks Are Actually Two Distinct Species
2012-06-05 11:14:06

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Despite inhabiting the same waters, two populations of Great White sharks living in the coastal waters of Australia are genetically distinct, according to a new study published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. The two groups of Great Whites, or white sharks, are separated by the Bass Strait, a stretch of water between the Australian mainland and Tasmania to the south. The research team, led by Dean Blower from the University of Queensland, used...

2012-03-05 10:45:14

Shark fins are worth more than other parts of the shark and are often removed from the body, which gets thrown back into the sea. To curtail this wasteful practice, many countries allow the fins to be landed detached from shark bodies, as long as their weight does not exceed five per cent of the total shark catch. New University of British Columbia research shows that this kind of legislation is too liberal. A study published this week in the journal Fish Biology analyzes the fin to body...

T. Rex's Killer Bite Revealed
2012-02-29 11:47:25

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have revealed that the jaw muscles of Tyrannosaurus rex suggest that the dinosaur had the most powerful bite of any living or extinct animal. The measurement, based on a laser scan of the dinosaur´s skull, showed that its bite was equivalent to up to 13,000 pounds -- four times more than previously estimated. Publishing their findings in the journal Biology Letters, the team scaled up the skulls of a human, an alligator, a juvenile T....

2012-02-14 08:00:00

The sciences website EurekaMag.com publishes insights into specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review covers the Great White Shark which is a large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans, Homo Erectus which is an extinct species of humans that lived between 1.3 to 1.8 million years ago, and Vostok station which is a Russian Antarctic research station at the southern Pole of Cold, with the lowest temperature on Earth of –89.2 degrees...

The Physics Behind Great White Shark Attacks On Seals
2011-12-11 06:05:35

Scientists use basic principles of underwater optics, physics to understand predator-prey interactions A new study examining the complex and dynamic interactions between white sharks and Cape fur seals in False Bay, South Africa, offers new insights on the physical conditions and biological factors underlying predator-prey interactions in the marine environment. University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science assistant professor Dr. Neil Hammerschlag, and a...

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2011-07-20 13:15:00

Scientists off South Africa's Cape were surprised as a half-ton great white shark jumped into their research boat with them, reports The Guardian. The marine researchers were caught off-guard as the 10-foot-long shark leapt into their boat, becoming trapped on deck for over an hour. The incident took place off Seal Island, near Mossel Bay, on South Africa's Cape coast. The crew used sardines to attract the sharks, which are known for bursting through the surface as they prey on seals....

2011-07-01 13:40:20

A new study co-authored by University of Florida researchers provides details on the first cookiecutter shark attack on a live human, a concern as warm summer waters attract more people to the ocean. The study currently online and appearing in the July print edition of Pacific Science warns that swimmers entering the cookiecutter's range of open ocean tropical waters may be considered prey. The sharks feed near the surface at night, meaning daytime swimmers are less likely to encounter them....


Latest Great white shark Reference Libraries

41_075c18f482c7e94c32131e865b1b9f62
2007-04-18 15:16:24

The Cookiecutter shark, Isistius brasiliensis, also known as the cigar shark or luminous shark, is a small rarely-seen dogfish shark. Anatomy and morphology The Cookiecutter sharks often glow green and grow up to 20 in (50 cm) long. The underside of the shark is bioluminescent, glowing a pale blue-green that matches the background light from the ocean's surface that serves as camouflage to creatures beneath it. However, a small non-luminescent patch appears black deceiving the shark's...

39_0a70127831e80015c923d4cc49f1bc58
2007-03-19 15:01:39

The Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the second largest fish after the whale shark. The basking shark is a cosmopolitan species - it is found in all the world's temperate oceans. It is a slow moving and generally harmless filter feeder. Like other large sharks, basking sharks are at risk of extinction due to a combination of low resilience and overfishing through increasing demands for the sharks' fins, flesh and organs. Taxonomy This shark is called the basking shark because it...

39_b06f453006746cc3df8571264c018544
2007-03-13 10:25:08

The Lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, is a well studied shark belonging to the family Carcharhinidae. Distribution and habitat It is found mainly along the subtropical and tropical parts of the Atlantic coast of North and South America. Reproduction Lemon sharks are viviparous, females giving birth to between 4 and 17 young every other year in warm and shallow lagoons. The young have to fend for themselves and remain in shallow water near mangroves until they grow larger. With...

39_50376e3bd6601f8177bc51caabcda03e
2007-03-13 10:15:41

The Oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, is a large pelagic shark of tropical and warm temperate seas. It is a stocky shark, most notable for its long, white tipped rounded fins. This aggressive but slow-moving fish dominates feeding frenzies, and has attacked more humans than all other shark species combined "” it is a notable danger to survivors of oceanic ship wrecks and downed aircraft. Recent studies have shown that its numbers are in steep decline "” its large fins...

39_c9e0feb046d74fe80994f3e3741de9f9
2007-03-13 10:06:17

The Bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas, also known as the Bull whaler, Zambezi River shark or colloquially Zambi, is common worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and well-known for its unpredictable, often aggressive behavior. They have a tolerance for fresh water that is unique among marine sharks, and can travel far up rivers, posing a threat to those who venture into the water. As a result they are probably responsible for the majority of attacks on humans that take place near the...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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