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Latest Green fluorescent protein Stories

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2009-11-11 14:25:37

Charting femtosecond energy flow could aid redesign of molecules to improve light capture University of California, Berkeley, chemists have discovered the secret to the success of a jellyfish protein whose green glow has made it the darling of biologists and the subject of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The researchers' study of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the structural changes it undergoes when it fluoresces is the cover story of the Nov. 12 issue of the journal...

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2009-10-23 09:49:15

A team of Harvard chemists led by X. Sunney Xie has developed a new microscopic technique for seeing, in color, molecules with undetectable fluorescence. The room-temperature technique allows researchers to identify previously unseen molecules in living organisms and offers broad applications in biomedical imaging and research. The scientists' results are published in the Oct. 22 issue of Nature. Partial funding for the project was provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF)....

82a05b4a26efb84a4e6949bb5dff30081
2009-05-21 08:03:55

Scripps scientists find unexpected role for proteins: antioxidants Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered a family of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) in a primitive sea animal, along with new clues about the role of the proteins that has nothing to do with their famous glow. GFPs recently gained international attention with the awarding of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, shared by UC San Diego's...

2009-05-08 09:20:02

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego "“ led by 2008 Nobel-Prize winner Roger Tsien, PhD "“ have shown that bacterial proteins called phytochromes can be engineered into infrared-fluorescent proteins (IFPs). Because the wavelength of IFPs is able to penetrate tissue, these proteins are suitable for whole-body imaging in small animals. Their findings will be published in the May 8 edition of the journal Science."The development of IFPs may be important for future...

2009-05-05 08:07:21

A crucial tool in the evolution of scientific capability in bioscience, the fluorescence microscope has allowed a generation of scientists to study the properties of proteins inside cells. Yet as human capacity for discovery has zoomed to the nanoscale, fluorescence microscopy has struggled to keep up. Now, a team that includes UGA engineer Peter Kner has developed a microscope that is capable of live imaging at double the resolution of fluorescence microscopy using structured illumination....

2009-04-10 08:15:00

Biologists at the University of Pennsylvania have revealed a hidden code that determines the expression level of a gene, providing a way to distinguish efficient genes from inefficient ones. The new research, which involved creating hundreds of synthetic green-glowing genes, provides an explanation for how a cell "knows" how much of each protein to make, providing just the right amount of protein to maintain homeostasis yet not too much to cause cell toxicity.In the study, Penn biologists...

05965ccd4f8020cb999cfa20b1a09de1
2009-04-02 10:40:00

Many longtime sailors have been mesmerized by the dazzling displays of green light often seen below the ocean surface in tropical seas. Now researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have uncovered key clues about the bioluminescent worms that produce the green glow and the biological mechanisms behind their light production.Marine fireworms use bioluminescence to attract suitors in an undersea mating ritual. Research conducted by Scripps marine biologists Dimitri...

45de4ea1924fbcbb2388db8d251c2edb1
2009-01-26 10:00:41

Einstein research helps scientists see cancer and other cells at the molecular level Remarkable new tools that spotlight individual cellular molecules are transforming biomedical research. Scientists at the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have spearheaded their use in a series of papers, including one published Sunday in the online version of Nature Methods. These new tools are photoactivatable fluorescent proteins (PAFPs) and...

2008-12-18 09:46:15

Imagine having GeneVision: the uncanny ability to view the activity of any chosen gene in real time through a specially modified camera.With GeneVision, military commanders could compare gene expression in victorious and defeated troops. Retailers could track genes related to craving as shoppers moved about a store. "The Bachelor" would enjoy yet one more secret advantage over his love-struck dates.Frightening? Perhaps. Ethically suspect? Certainly. Preposterous? Not quite.A new study in BMC...

0a46de23b631c84823382f6b6c66443e1
2008-11-19 14:55:41

A study published in the scientific journal PLoS ONE highlights how the exploration of the ocean depths can benefit humankind. This is the story of a voyage of discovery, starting with marine animals that glow, the identification of the molecules responsible and their application as marker in living cells. Many marine organisms such as sea anemones and corals produce fluorescent proteins, which come in a variety of dazzling hues. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized biomedical research by...


Latest Green fluorescent protein Reference Libraries

39_ace37de56045e8be057061f572139540
2007-04-10 16:07:52

The Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a tropical fish belonging to the minnow family (Cyprinidae). It is a popular aquarium fish, where it is frequently sold under the trade name Zebra danio, and is also an important model organism. Characteristics The zebrafish arose in the Ganges region in Eastern India and is also native to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Myanmar. It commonly inhabits streams, canals, ditches, ponds and slow-moving to stagnant water bodies, including rice fields. The...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.