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Latest Green fluorescent protein Stories

2008-10-09 21:00:19

Osamu Shimomura of Japan and Americans Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien were honoured for their work on green fluorescent protein, or GFP.Researchers worldwide now use GFP to track such processes as the development of brain cells, the growth of tumours and the spread of cancer cells.It has let them study nerve cell damage from Alzheimer's disease and see how insulin-producing beta cells arise in the pancreas of a growing embryo, for example.The academy compared the impact on science to the...

2008-10-09 09:00:15

By MALCOLM RITTER By Malcolm Ritter The Associated Press NEW YORK Three U.S.-based scientists won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for turning a glowing green protein from jellyfish into a revolutionary way to watch the tiniest details of life within cells and living creatures. Osamu Shimomura, a Japanese citizen who works in the United States, and Americans Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien shared the chemistry prize for discovering and developing green fluorescent protein, or GFP. When...

2008-10-09 06:00:18

A TRICK three scientists learned from jellyfish has won them the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Americans Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien and Osamu Shimomura, from Japan, were honoured for their discovery of the green fluorescent protein that allows the creatures to glow. The "glowing markers" are now to tag and track biological systems, for example how cancer cells spread. (c) 2008 Daily Record; Glasgow (UK). Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

2008-10-09 06:00:18

By Kenneth Chang One Japanese and two American scientists have received the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for taking the ability of some jellyfish to glow green and transforming it into a ubiquitous tool of molecular biology to watch the dance of living cells and the proteins within them. The new laureates are Osamu Shimomura, a Japanese-born emeritus professor at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Boston University Medical School; Martin Chalfie, a...

2008-10-09 06:00:18

By Dan Vergano Glowing jellyfish have lit the way to 2008's Nobel Prize in chemistry for one Japanese and two American researchers, pioneers in illuminating biological processes inside cells and behind diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's. Osamu Shimomura, 80, of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.; Martin Chalfie, 61, of Columbia University in New York; and Roger Tsien, 56, of the University of California-San Diego will split the $1.4 million prize, the Royal...

2008-10-09 00:00:03

World in brief STOCKHOLM A clever trick borrowed from jellyfish has earned two Americans and a Japanese scientist the Nobel Prize for chemistry. The $1.4m prize recognises Osamu Shimomura, now of Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Martin Chalfie of Columbia University in New York, and Roger Tsien, of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein (GFP) - the genetic mechanism responsible for luminosity in jellyfish....

2008-10-08 18:00:10

Tokyo, Oct. 8 (Jiji Press)--Osamu Shimomura, professor emeritus at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole in the U.S. state of Massachusetts, has won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, becoming this year's fourth Japanese Nobel Prize recipient, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Wednesday. The award, worth 10 million Swedish kronor, or 140 million yen, is shared equally by Shimomura, 80, and two U.S. researchers-- Martin Chalfie, junior professor of Biological Sciences at...

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2008-10-08 13:05:00

Two Americans and one Japanese researcher were awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of a brightly glowing protein first seen in jellyfish, which has helped scientists understand how cancer cells spread. American researchers Martin Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego and Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts received...

2008-10-08 09:00:07

Three U.S. chemists share the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery of the green fluorescent protein, the Nobel Foundation said Wednesday. Osamu Shimomura of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., and Boston University Medical School; Martin Chalfie of Columbia University and Roger Tsien, of University of California-San Diego were recognized for their work in discovering the green fluorescent protein, or GFP, in the 1960s and developments that led to its use as a...

2008-09-07 03:00:06

By Guo, Woei-Jiun Ho, Thun-Hua David Plant HVA22 is a unique abscisic acid (ABA)/stress-induced protein first isolated from barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. Its yeast homolog, Yop1p, functions in vesicular trafficking and in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network in vivo. To examine the roles of plant HVA22, barley HVA22 was ectopically expressed in barley aleurone cells. Overexpression of HVA22 proteins inhibited gibberellin (GA)-induced formation of large digestive vacuoles, which...


Latest Green fluorescent protein Reference Libraries

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2007-04-10 16:07:52

The Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a tropical fish belonging to the minnow family (Cyprinidae). It is a popular aquarium fish, where it is frequently sold under the trade name Zebra danio, and is also an important model organism. Characteristics The zebrafish arose in the Ganges region in Eastern India and is also native to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Myanmar. It commonly inhabits streams, canals, ditches, ponds and slow-moving to stagnant water bodies, including rice fields. The...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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