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Latest Greenhouse effect Stories

Unique Greenhouse Gas Meter Developed
2014-06-18 03:59:50

Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology MIPT’s Laboratory for the Spectroscopy of Planetary Atmospheres has come up with a high-resolution meter to gauge the concentration of gases in the atmosphere with unparalleled precision. The infrared spectrum radiometer is described in an article recently published in the journal Optics Express. The paper, authored by Alexander Rodin, Artem Klimchuk, Alexander Nadezhdinsky, Dmitry Churbanov and Maxim Spiridonov, says that the new spectrum...

Earth’s CO2 And Climate Stabilized By Ancient Forests
2014-01-24 12:38:58

European Geosciences Union UK researchers have identified a biological mechanism that could explain how the Earth’s atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate were stabilized over the past 24 million years. When CO2 levels became too low for plants to grow properly, forests appear to have kept the climate in check by slowing down the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The results are now published in Biogeosciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)....

Reversing Climate Change Cannot Be Accomplished Via Geoengineering
2013-12-05 13:59:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geoengineering the climate has been suggested as a way  to help lessen the impact of climate change, but new research published in Earth System Dynamics says this approach would not likely succeed. German researchers say that reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the planet’s surface by geoengineering may not undo climate change. The team used a simple energy balance analysis to explain how the Earth’s water cycle responds...

Young Sun Paradox Early Climate
2013-10-04 13:46:54

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When life originated on Earth between 3.8 and 2.4 billion years ago during the Archean era, our sun was only functioning at about 75 percent of its current power. With this ‘low wattage’ sun, the Earth should have been covered in glaciers, yet scientists have found no evidence of this taking place. In a new study published recently by the journal Science, a team of international researchers’ analysis of rock samples dating back...

Runaway Greenhouse Planet
2013-07-30 11:42:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When a planet absorbs too much solar radiation, its atmosphere reaches a tipping point - overheating, boiling its oceans and filling with steam. The result is an uninhabitable world much like Venus. This 'runaway greenhouse' phenomenon typically occurs just inside the habitable zone orbited by planets like Earth, and a new report in Nature Geoscience indicates that reaching the tipping point may be easier than previously thought....

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2013-03-27 18:31:41

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online It has long been known that light colors can reflect heat, while dark colors can absorb heat, but it is all a matter of light. This is because light is energy and darker colors have greater absorption, thus more heat. Even light-colored materials, such as cement or concrete, can absorb heat during the day and release it at night. Because buildings are used primarily during the day, it is typically required to cool them during...

Arctic Warming Connected To Reduction Of Sea Ice And Increased Global Warming
2012-07-10 10:35:10

Temperatures are rising four times faster in the Artic than the global average, a new University of Melbourne study shows. The combination of melting sea ice and global warming are contributing to the different rates. Professor Ian Simmonds from the University of Melbourne´s School of Earth Sciences, co-author of the study, said this information showed that a combined effect at ground and atmospheric level played a key role in raising the rate of warming in the Arctic. “Loss...

Image 1 - NOAA Greenhouse Gas Index On The Rise
2011-11-10 10:06:45

[ Watch the Video ] NOAA´s updated Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), which measures the direct climate influence of many greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, shows a continued steady upward trend that began with the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s. Started in 2004, the AGGI reached 1.29 in 2010. That means the combined heating effect of long-lived greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere by human activities has increased by 29 percent since 1990, the...

2011-05-18 00:19:41

The mass extinction of marine life in our oceans during prehistoric times is a warning that the Earth will see such an extinction again because of high levels of greenhouse gases, according to new research by geologists. Professor Martin Kennedy from the University of Adelaide (School of Earth & Environmental Sciences) and Professor Thomas Wagner from Newcastle University (Civil Engineering and Geosciences) have been studying 'greenhouse oceans' "“ oceans that have been depleted of...

2010-10-15 16:53:57

Water vapor and clouds are the major contributors to Earth's greenhouse effect, but a new atmosphere-ocean climate modeling study shows that the planet's temperature ultimately depends on the atmospheric level of carbon dioxide. The study, conducted by Andrew Lacis and colleagues at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, examined the nature of Earth's greenhouse effect and clarified the role that greenhouse gases and clouds play in absorbing outgoing infrared...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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