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Latest Greenhouse gas Stories

Understanding A Century Of Human Impact On Arctic Climate
2013-09-12 13:02:22

The Arctic is the most rapidly warming region of the globe, but warming has not been uniform and the drivers behind this warming not fully understood even during the 20th century.

2013-09-09 08:52:31

With almost 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) released each year from burning coal, gasoline, diesel and other fossil fuels in the United States alone, scientists are seeking ways to turn the tables on the No. 1 greenhouse gas and convert that troublesome CO2 back into fuel.

Global Warming Increases Risk Of Record Heat
2013-09-06 04:50:27

Last July was the hottest month in the history of US weather record keeping, but it may not hold that title for long, researchers from Stanford University claim in a recently-published report.


Latest Greenhouse gas Reference Libraries

Earth's Atmosphere
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Earth's Atmosphere -- Earth's atmosphere consists of nitrogen (78.1%) and oxygen (20.9%), with small amounts of argon (0.9%), carbon dioxide (variable, but around 0.035%), water vapor, and other gases. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. 75% of the atmosphere exists within 11km of the planetary surface. Temperature and the Atmospheric Layers The temperature of the Earth's atmosphere...

8_0a0df4f1bee06ec8e535aec78634f0a12
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Terraforming -- Terraforming (literally, "Earth-shaping") is the process of modifying a planet, moon or other body to a more habitable atmosphere, temperature or ecology. The term was first used in a science fiction novel, 'Seetee Shock' (1940?) by Jack Williamson, but the actual concept is older than that. An example in fiction is 'First and Last Men' by Olaf Stapledon in which Venus is modified, after a long and destructive war with the original inhabitants, who naturally object to the...

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Word of the Day
postliminy
  • In Roman antiquity, the return of a person who had been banished, or taken prisoner by an enemy, to his old condition and former privileges.
  • In international law, that right by virtue of which persons and things taken by an enemy in war are restored to their former status when coming again under the power of the nation to which they belonged.
The word 'postliminy' comes from a Latin word meaning 'threshold'.