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Latest Greenland Stories

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2009-12-16 09:27:00

Researchers learning more about how water beneath glaciers contributes to ice loss Scientists who study the melting of Greenland's glaciers are discovering that water flowing beneath the ice plays a much more complex role than they previously imagined. Researchers previously thought that meltwater simply lubricated ice against the bedrock, speeding the flow of glaciers out to sea. Now, new studies have revealed that the effect of meltwater on acceleration and ice loss -- through fast-moving...

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2009-12-15 10:51:34

The analysis of microfossils found in ocean sediment cores is illuminating the environmental conditions that prevailed at high latitudes during a critical period of Earth history. Around 55 million years ago at the beginning of the Eocene epoch, the Earth's poles are believed to have been free of ice. But by the early Oligocene around 25 million years later, ice sheets covered Antarctica and continental ice had developed on Greenland. "This change from greenhouse to icehouse conditions...

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2009-12-15 06:20:00

A U.S. government agency predicted the melting of the polar ice cap in the year 2030. However, climate guru Al Gore said at the U.N. climate conference on Monday that new computer modeling indicates this could happen as soon as 2014. One U.S. government scientist on Monday said the new prediction was too severe, but other researchers have previously projected a quicker end than 2030 to the Arctic summer ice cap. Former U.S. Vice President Gore said, "It is hard to capture the astonishment...

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2009-11-12 14:26:09

Satellite observations and a state-of-the art regional atmospheric model have independently confirmed that the Greenland ice sheet is loosing mass at an accelerating rate, reports a new study in Science. This mass loss is equally distributed between increased iceberg production, driven by acceleration of Greenland's fast-flowing outlet glaciers, and increased meltwater production at the ice sheet surface. Recent warm summers further accelerated the mass loss to 273 Gt per year (1 Gt is the...

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2009-10-31 10:20:00

Canada and Greenland are taking steps to protect populations of polar bears that live between the two countries, officials announced on Friday. Canada's Environment Minister Jim Prentice announced this during a conference call after he signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) along with Greenland's Minister of Fisheries, Hunting and Agriculture, Ane Hansen and Prentice's Nunavut territory representative Daniel Shewchuk. The deal suggests the writing of a partnered committee that would...

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2009-10-20 08:12:07

In 2007 alone, it lost volume equivalent to draining San Francisco Bay every week Not that long ago "“ the blink of a geologic eye "“ global temperatures were so warm that ice on Greenland could have been hard to come by. Today, the largest island in the world is covered with ice 1.6 miles thick. Even so, Greenland has become a hot spot for climate scientists. Why? Because tiny bubbles trapped in the ice layers may help resolve a fundamental question about global warming: how fast...

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2009-10-20 07:55:00

An analysis of sediment cores indicates that biological and chemical changes occurring at a remote Arctic lake are unprecedented over the past 200,000 years and likely are the result of human-caused climate change, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. While environmental changes at the lake over the past millennia have been shown to be tightly linked with natural causes of climate change -- like periodic, well-understood wobbles in Earth's orbit -- changes...

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2009-09-30 06:03:09

At an Oxford University climate conference, experts announced that sea levels across the globe will almost inevitably rise more than 6 feet. "The crux of the sea level issue is that it starts very slowly but once it gets going it is practically unstoppable," said Stefan Rahmstorf, a scientist at Germany's Potsdam Institute and a broadly respected sea level expert. "There is no way I can see to stop this rise, even if we have gone to zero emissions." According to Rahmstorf, the best outcome...

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2009-09-28 14:35:00

Scientists are taking a more in-depth view of how climate change could affect Antarctica's ice, and how even a small change in temperature could lead to a global rise in sea levels. "If you're going to have even a few meters it will change the geography of the planet," Rajendra Pachauri, head of the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) told Reuters. "Greenland and Antarctica are two huge bodies of ice sitting on land that could really have very serious implications for the...

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2009-09-24 12:25:25

According to a study that might help predict rising sea levels linked to climate change, scientists are surprised at how fast coastal ice in Antarctica and Greenland is thinning. Scientists at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Bristol University said that glaciers speeding up when they flowed into the sea caused the biggest loss of ice, which was seen by analysis of missions of NASA satellite laser images. "We were surprised to see such a strong pattern of thinning glaciers across such...


Latest Greenland Reference Libraries

Erik The Red
2014-01-06 11:48:00

Known as Erik the Red, Erik Thorvaldsson is remembered in medieval and Icelandic saga sources as having founded the first Norse settlement in Greenland. The Icelandic tradition signifies that he was born in Rogaland, Norway. The designation “the Red” probably refers to his hair or his beard color. Leif Ericson, the well-known Icelandic explorer, was Erik’s son. When Erik the Red’s father was exiled from Norway due to manslaughter, he sailed west from Norway accompanied by...

Leif Ericson
2014-01-06 10:25:39

Leif Ericson was a Norse explorer seen as the first European to land in North America nearly 500 years prior to Christopher Columbus. According to the Sagas of Icelanders, he established a Norse settlement at Vinland, identified with the Norse L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern point of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada. It is believed that Leif was born in Iceland around the 970’s - the son of father Erik the Red, an explorer and outlaw from Western Norway. Erik founded the first...

Harp Seal
2013-05-01 15:08:34

The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), also known as the saddleback seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. It is native to northern areas of the Atlantic Ocean and to some areas of the Arctic Ocean. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland,” and it was previously classified within Phoca genus, although studies have shown that it is unique enough to be in a distinct genus. It holds two recognized subspecies, P. groenlandicus groenlandicus and P. groenlandicus oceanicus....

Baffin Bay
2013-04-18 13:21:50

Baffin Bay, which is located between Baffin Island and the southwest coast of Greenland, is a marginal sea of the North Atlantic Ocean. It’s connected to the Atlantic by Davis Strait and the Labrador Sea. A narrower Nares Strait connects the Baffin Bay with the Arctic Ocean. The Baffin Bay is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that is bordered by Baffin Island towards the west, Greenland towards the east, and Ellesmere Island towards the north. It is connected to the Atlantic through the Davis...

Muskox, Ovibos moschatus
2012-10-01 10:05:00

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also known as the musk ox, is native to the Arctic areas of Canada, United Sates, and Greenland. Populations have been introduced into Norway, Sweden, and Siberia, but these are small. There was a population in Antarctica, but it was wiped out due to hunting and climate change, which caused its habitat to decline. Despite this, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service introduced a new population onto Nunivak Island in Antarctica, as a means of supported...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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