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Latest Greenland Stories

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2009-07-09 15:20:00

One of the world's largest glaciers is under attack from global climate change, researchers reported on Thursday. Located along Greenland's west coast, Ilulissat is known as the most active glacier in the northern hemisphere and among the world's largest. An American study last summer showed that climate change had melted 60 square miles of surface area from the UNESCO-listed glacier from 2001-2005. A recent report by Andreas Peter Ahlstroem, of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland,...

2009-07-08 07:00:00

HOUSTON, July 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- ION Geophysical Corporation (NYSE: IO) today announced that it has initiated the next phase of its ArcticSPAN(TM) seismic data program. Recognizing the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic region, which the United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates could contain nearly 25% of the world's undiscovered oil and gas resources, several of the world's largest energy companies have agreed to underwrite a new, basin-scale imaging project to study the...

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2009-07-01 12:37:08

On Tuesday, Denmark said negotiations on a new global climate deal were going "too slowly" and that the process needed to speed up in order to be prepared for the crucial UN summit less than six months away. "It is time for a frank and open dialogue so the participating countries can make clear their positions, their concerns," said Danish Climate Minister Connie Hedegaard. The United Nations is hoping to finish negotiations in Copenhagen by December for a new global warming treaty intended...

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2009-07-01 10:40:00

New research, which reconstructs the extent of ice in the sea between Greenland and Svalbard from the 13th century to the present indicates that there has never been so little sea ice as there is now. The research results from the Niels Bohr Institute, among others, are published in the scientific journal, Climate Dynamics.There are of course neither satellite images nor instrumental records of the climate all the way back to the 13th century, but nature has its own 'archive' of the climate...

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2009-06-26 12:55:00

A U.S. fisheries expert and outgoing chair of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) proposed that ending the commercial hunting ban on whales could actually benefit whale conservation efforts, BBC News reported. This year's IWC meeting saw pro- and anti-whaling nations agree to further compromise talks and deferred a decision on a controversial bid from Greenland to add humpback whales to its annual hunt. The Greenland Inuit are granted hunting quotas because they are one of the...

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2009-06-24 06:25:00

Environmentalists are infuriated by a Danish request for consent to continue hunting humpback whales of the coast of Greenland, the AFP accounted. Ole Samsing, Danish commissioner at the annual International Whaling Commission (IWC) conference being held on the Portuguese island of Madeira, immediately demanded a "quick solution" in light of the request. "We want to put forward a proposal for a quota of 10 humpback whales per year for the 2010-2012 period" in Greenland, a semi-autonomous...

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2009-06-21 12:40:00

Findings are relevant to modern Greenland ice sheet, says UB researcher Modern glaciers, such as those making up the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, are capable of undergoing periods of rapid shrinkage or retreat, according to new findings by paleoclimatologists at the University at Buffalo. The paper, published on June 21 in Nature Geoscience, describes fieldwork demonstrating that a prehistoric glacier in the Canadian Arctic rapidly retreated in just a few hundred years. The proof of...

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2009-06-17 16:00:00

Scientists have uncovered a bird's nest believed to be 2,500 years old on a cliff in Greenland. The discovery is the oldest raptor nest ever recorded, and the site is still in use today by gyrfalcons, the largest falcon species in the world. Three other nests, each over 1,000 years old, were also discovered, one of which includes feathers from a bird that lived more than six centuries ago.But ornithologists worry that climate change could soon drive the falcons from these ancient...

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2009-06-17 06:35:00

Environmentalists made their opinions known at a key meeting on Tuesday involving plans to resume the hunting of humpback whales, which went under a moratorium protection over 40 years ago.The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS) said Greenland intends to ask a summit on Monday to grant it permission to hunt 50 humpbacks over five years."Denmark is lobbying intensely, with the support of Sweden, to build a European consensus in favor of Greenland's proposal," WDCS spokesman Nicolas...

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2009-06-12 08:32:52

The Greenland ice sheet is melting faster than expected according to a new study led by a University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher and published in the journal Hydrological Processes. Study results indicate that the ice sheet may be responsible for nearly 25 percent of global sea rise in the past 13 years. The study also shows that seas now are rising by more than 3 millimeters a year--more than 50 percent faster than the average for the 20th century. UAF researcher Sebastian H. Mernild and...


Latest Greenland Reference Libraries

Erik The Red
2014-01-06 11:48:00

Known as Erik the Red, Erik Thorvaldsson is remembered in medieval and Icelandic saga sources as having founded the first Norse settlement in Greenland. The Icelandic tradition signifies that he was born in Rogaland, Norway. The designation “the Red” probably refers to his hair or his beard color. Leif Ericson, the well-known Icelandic explorer, was Erik’s son. When Erik the Red’s father was exiled from Norway due to manslaughter, he sailed west from Norway accompanied by...

Leif Ericson
2014-01-06 10:25:39

Leif Ericson was a Norse explorer seen as the first European to land in North America nearly 500 years prior to Christopher Columbus. According to the Sagas of Icelanders, he established a Norse settlement at Vinland, identified with the Norse L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern point of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada. It is believed that Leif was born in Iceland around the 970’s - the son of father Erik the Red, an explorer and outlaw from Western Norway. Erik founded the first...

Harp Seal
2013-05-01 15:08:34

The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), also known as the saddleback seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. It is native to northern areas of the Atlantic Ocean and to some areas of the Arctic Ocean. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland,” and it was previously classified within Phoca genus, although studies have shown that it is unique enough to be in a distinct genus. It holds two recognized subspecies, P. groenlandicus groenlandicus and P. groenlandicus oceanicus....

Baffin Bay
2013-04-18 13:21:50

Baffin Bay, which is located between Baffin Island and the southwest coast of Greenland, is a marginal sea of the North Atlantic Ocean. It’s connected to the Atlantic by Davis Strait and the Labrador Sea. A narrower Nares Strait connects the Baffin Bay with the Arctic Ocean. The Baffin Bay is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that is bordered by Baffin Island towards the west, Greenland towards the east, and Ellesmere Island towards the north. It is connected to the Atlantic through the Davis...

Muskox, Ovibos moschatus
2012-10-01 10:05:00

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also known as the musk ox, is native to the Arctic areas of Canada, United Sates, and Greenland. Populations have been introduced into Norway, Sweden, and Siberia, but these are small. There was a population in Antarctica, but it was wiped out due to hunting and climate change, which caused its habitat to decline. Despite this, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service introduced a new population onto Nunivak Island in Antarctica, as a means of supported...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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