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Latest Greenland Stories

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2009-06-01 13:39:42

Ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a far milder climate than today that featured lush, swampy forests, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Jaelyn Eberle said the study shows several varieties of prehistoric mammals as heavy as 1,000 pounds each lived on what is today Ellesmere Island near Greenland on a summer diet of...

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2009-05-28 06:25:00

Scientists say that a number of the United States' most populous east coast cities "” including New York and Boston "” could see higher than expected rises in sea levels if Greenland's glacial-melt continues at its current rate. Researchers reported that sea levels on North America's northeast coast could potentially rise by 12 to 20 inches more than other coastal regions if the melting of Greenland's ice sheet continues to accelerate. Because of the tremendous quantity of fresh...

2009-05-27 11:24:17

Scientists say the ongoing melting of the Greenland ice sheet might drive more water than previously thought toward the U.S. and Canadian coastlines. Scientists led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research said if Greenland's ice melts at a moderate to high rate, ocean circulation by 2100 could shift, raising sea levels at New York, Boston, Halifax and other cities in the northeastern United States and Canada about 12-20 inches more than in other coastal areas. The research builds on...

2009-05-08 16:35:19

Suicide rates in Greenland increase during the summer, peaking in June, perhaps due to the insomnia caused by incessant daylight, researchers in Sweden say. The study, published in the journal BMC Psychiatry, finds there was a concentration of suicides in the summer months, and this seasonal effect was especially pronounced in the north of the country -- an area where the sun doesn't set between the end of April and the end of August. Study leader Karin Sparring Bjorksten of the Karolinska...

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2009-05-08 11:25:00

Researchers have found that insomnia caused by the incessant sunlight of long summer days in places like Greenland is causing an increased rate of suicide. It has been commonly believed that the number of suicide cases tends to increase in late autumn and early winter months with more hours of darkness, however new findings indicate that regions experiencing constant sunlight in summer seasons may be equally hazardous. Karin Sparring Bjorksten of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and...

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2009-04-30 12:55:00

NASA will 'break the ice' on a pair of new airborne radars that can help monitor climate change when a team of scientists embarks this week on a two-month expedition to the vast, frigid terrain of Greenland and Iceland. Scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., will depart Dryden Friday, May 1, on a modified NASA Gulfstream III aircraft. In a pod beneath the aircraft's fuselage will be two JPL-developed radars that...

2009-04-24 09:56:25

An analysis of ancient Greenland ice suggests a spike in the greenhouse gas methane about 11,600 years ago originated from wetlands rather than the ocean floor or from permafrost, a finding that is good news according to the University of Colorado at Boulder scientist who led the study.Methane bound up in ocean sediments and permafrost, called methane clathrate, has been a concern to scientists because of its huge volume, greenhouse gas potency and potential for release during periods of...

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2009-04-24 06:15:00

According to scientists, Greenland's icesheet has revealed a store of methane that appears to be more stable that previously thought, easing tensions over a rapid rise in global temperatures. Vast amounts of methane, a gas that is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide (CO2) at trapping heat within the atmosphere, is trapped within the permafrost in the far northern hemisphere, and in seabed deposits called clathrates. Scientists have feared that the release of the clathrate reservoir...

2009-04-23 09:02:17

International effort locates man missing since Wednesday evening from Summit Station in central GreenlandOfficials with the National Science Foundation formally expressed their gratitude to the multi-nation team that rescued a staff member who had been missing from Wednesday evening to Saturday morning from the foundation's research station at Summit, Greenland.The missing man was identified as a 38-year-old U.S. citizen who works as a heavy equipment operator at the station for a...

2009-04-22 12:03:00

Former Vice President Al Gore, foreign ministers and climate change scientists will meet on April 28 in the town of Tromso in Northern Norway to discuss the impacts of melting ice in Antarctica, the Arctic and mountain areas worldwide. TROMSO, Norway, April 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The conference Melting Ice: Regional Dramas, Global Wake-Up Call takes place on April 28, the day before the Arctic Council's annual ministerial meeting on April 29. A number of foreign ministers from the...


Latest Greenland Reference Libraries

Erik The Red
2014-01-06 11:48:00

Known as Erik the Red, Erik Thorvaldsson is remembered in medieval and Icelandic saga sources as having founded the first Norse settlement in Greenland. The Icelandic tradition signifies that he was born in Rogaland, Norway. The designation “the Red” probably refers to his hair or his beard color. Leif Ericson, the well-known Icelandic explorer, was Erik’s son. When Erik the Red’s father was exiled from Norway due to manslaughter, he sailed west from Norway accompanied by...

Leif Ericson
2014-01-06 10:25:39

Leif Ericson was a Norse explorer seen as the first European to land in North America nearly 500 years prior to Christopher Columbus. According to the Sagas of Icelanders, he established a Norse settlement at Vinland, identified with the Norse L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern point of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada. It is believed that Leif was born in Iceland around the 970’s - the son of father Erik the Red, an explorer and outlaw from Western Norway. Erik founded the first...

Harp Seal
2013-05-01 15:08:34

The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), also known as the saddleback seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. It is native to northern areas of the Atlantic Ocean and to some areas of the Arctic Ocean. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland,” and it was previously classified within Phoca genus, although studies have shown that it is unique enough to be in a distinct genus. It holds two recognized subspecies, P. groenlandicus groenlandicus and P. groenlandicus oceanicus....

Baffin Bay
2013-04-18 13:21:50

Baffin Bay, which is located between Baffin Island and the southwest coast of Greenland, is a marginal sea of the North Atlantic Ocean. It’s connected to the Atlantic by Davis Strait and the Labrador Sea. A narrower Nares Strait connects the Baffin Bay with the Arctic Ocean. The Baffin Bay is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that is bordered by Baffin Island towards the west, Greenland towards the east, and Ellesmere Island towards the north. It is connected to the Atlantic through the Davis...

Muskox, Ovibos moschatus
2012-10-01 10:05:00

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also known as the musk ox, is native to the Arctic areas of Canada, United Sates, and Greenland. Populations have been introduced into Norway, Sweden, and Siberia, but these are small. There was a population in Antarctica, but it was wiped out due to hunting and climate change, which caused its habitat to decline. Despite this, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service introduced a new population onto Nunivak Island in Antarctica, as a means of supported...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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