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Latest Greenland Stories

2012-03-14 13:51:15

But projections for increase today still loom large The seas are creeping higher as the planet warms. But how high will they go? Projections for the year 2100 range from inches to several feet, or more. The sub-tropical islands of Bermuda and the Bahamas contain important sites where researchers have gone looking for answers; by pinpointing where shorelines stood on cliffs and reefs there during an extremely warm period 400,000 years ago, they hope to narrow the range of global sea-level...

2012-03-12 11:16:09

The Greenland ice sheet is likely to be more vulnerable to global warming than previously thought. The temperature threshold for melting the ice sheet completely is in the range of 0.8 to 3.2 degrees Celsius global warming, with a best estimate of 1.6 degrees above pre-industrial levels, shows a new study by scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Today, already 0.8 degrees global warming has been observed. Substantial...

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2012-03-12 06:28:10

German and Spanish researchers have discovered that the Greenland ice sheet may be more vulnerable to the effects of global climate change than initially thought, and that temperatures may not have to rise much more before it could be lost for good. According to Bloomberg reporter Alex Morales, scientists at the Complutense University in Madrid (UCM) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) are reporting that the ice sheet could lose its ability to grow if the global...

Sturdy Scandinavian Conifers Survived Ice Age
2012-03-04 05:52:45

[ Watch the Video] Until now, it was presumed that the last glacial period denuded the Scandinavian landscape of trees until a gradual return of milder weather began and melted away the ice cover some 9000 years ago. That perspective is now disproved by research headed by Professor Eske Willerslev from the Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Laura Parducci from the University of Uppsala, Sweden, and Inger Greve Alsos from Tromsø University Museum,...

New Study Sheds Light On Little Ice Age
2012-01-30 15:44:41

University of Colorado researchers report that they have answered some questions surrounding Earth's Little Ice Age, which started between A.D. 1275 and 1300, and lasted into the late 19th century. According to the new study, the Little Ice Age was triggered by repeated, explosive volcanism and sustained by a self-perpetuating sea ice-ocean feedback system in the North Atlantic Ocean. Professor Gifford Miller, who led the study, said the team's evidence from radiocarbon dates from dead...

Image 1 - Increased Ice Loss Resulted In Greater Greenland Bedrock Lifting
2011-12-11 06:42:42

A higher-than-normal 2010 melting season sped up the melting of ice in southern Greenland, causing sizable portions of the island's bedrock to rise somewhere about a quarter of an inch more than usual, an Ohio State University (OSU) researcher said on Friday. According to an OSU press release, Michael Bevis, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Geodynamics and professor in the OSU School of Earth Sciences, said that 50 GPS stations spread across the coast of Greenland normally "detect uplift of 15 mm...

Image 1 - Paleoclimate Record Points Toward Potential Rapid Climate Changes
2011-12-10 04:29:55

New research into the Earth's paleoclimate history by NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies director James E. Hansen suggests the potential for rapid climate changes this century, including multiple meters of sea level rise, if global warming is not abated. By looking at how the Earth's climate responded to past natural changes, Hansen sought insight into a fundamental question raised by ongoing human-caused climate change: "What is the dangerous level of global warming?" Some...

Record-Breaking Arctic Warming Leaves Winners And Losers
2011-12-02 14:44:46

A new report from a group of multination scientists says that the planet´s Arctic is moving into a warmer phase compared with previous years. And as with most all major environmental changes, there are both winners and losers as temperatures rise. Researchers from 14 nations published the now famous Arctic Report Card on Thursday in which they stated that average air temperatures in the region were significantly elevated in 2011 compared with previous thirty years--on average some 2.5...

2011-10-31 07:00:00

HOUSTON, Oct. 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- ION Geophysical Corporation (NYSE: IO) today announced that it has acquired an additional 5,200 km of regional seismic data from offshore Northeast Greenland, bringing the total kilometers the company has acquired in the region over the last two seasons to nearly 18,000. The Arctic is one of the least explored, most prospective regions in the world, containing an estimated one-quarter of the earth's undiscovered hydrocarbons, including an estimated...

Extreme Melting On Greenland Ice Sheet Reported
2011-10-26 03:32:48

Glacial Melt Cycle Could Become Self-Amplifying, Making it Difficult to Halt The Greenland ice sheet can experience extreme melting even when temperatures don´t hit record highs, according to a new analysis by Dr. Marco Tedesco, assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at The City College of New York.  His findings suggest that glaciers could undergo a self-amplifying cycle of melting and warming that would be difficult to halt. “We are...


Latest Greenland Reference Libraries

Erik The Red
2014-01-06 11:48:00

Known as Erik the Red, Erik Thorvaldsson is remembered in medieval and Icelandic saga sources as having founded the first Norse settlement in Greenland. The Icelandic tradition signifies that he was born in Rogaland, Norway. The designation “the Red” probably refers to his hair or his beard color. Leif Ericson, the well-known Icelandic explorer, was Erik’s son. When Erik the Red’s father was exiled from Norway due to manslaughter, he sailed west from Norway accompanied by...

Leif Ericson
2014-01-06 10:25:39

Leif Ericson was a Norse explorer seen as the first European to land in North America nearly 500 years prior to Christopher Columbus. According to the Sagas of Icelanders, he established a Norse settlement at Vinland, identified with the Norse L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern point of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada. It is believed that Leif was born in Iceland around the 970’s - the son of father Erik the Red, an explorer and outlaw from Western Norway. Erik founded the first...

Harp Seal
2013-05-01 15:08:34

The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), also known as the saddleback seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. It is native to northern areas of the Atlantic Ocean and to some areas of the Arctic Ocean. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland,” and it was previously classified within Phoca genus, although studies have shown that it is unique enough to be in a distinct genus. It holds two recognized subspecies, P. groenlandicus groenlandicus and P. groenlandicus oceanicus....

Baffin Bay
2013-04-18 13:21:50

Baffin Bay, which is located between Baffin Island and the southwest coast of Greenland, is a marginal sea of the North Atlantic Ocean. It’s connected to the Atlantic by Davis Strait and the Labrador Sea. A narrower Nares Strait connects the Baffin Bay with the Arctic Ocean. The Baffin Bay is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that is bordered by Baffin Island towards the west, Greenland towards the east, and Ellesmere Island towards the north. It is connected to the Atlantic through the Davis...

Muskox, Ovibos moschatus
2012-10-01 10:05:00

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also known as the musk ox, is native to the Arctic areas of Canada, United Sates, and Greenland. Populations have been introduced into Norway, Sweden, and Siberia, but these are small. There was a population in Antarctica, but it was wiped out due to hunting and climate change, which caused its habitat to decline. Despite this, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service introduced a new population onto Nunivak Island in Antarctica, as a means of supported...

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