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Latest Growth cone Stories

2012-01-30 12:36:51

A new study in the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org) uses state-of-the-art fluorescence microscopy to provide a striking 3-D picture of how class V myosins (myoV) "walk" along their actin track. The myosin superfamily of mechanoenzymes, more commonly referred to as molecular motors, play an important role in muscle contraction and other basic cellular processes. MyoV, one of the most highly studied molecular motors, has the ability to travel long distances by taking multiple...

2011-11-07 16:43:52

How a molecular traffic jam impacts cell division Interdisciplinary research between biology and physics aims to understand the cell and how it organizes internally. The mechanisms inside the cell are very complicated. LMU biophysicist Professor Erwin Frey, who is also a member of the Cluster of Excellence “Nanosystems Initiative Munich” (NIM) is working with his group on one particular issue involved in the cell´s life. The professor for statistical and biological physics...

2011-02-14 16:26:20

Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have discovered new ways by which nerves are guided to grow in highly directed ways to wire the brain during embryonic development. Their finding, detailed in a paper in the February 15 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, provides a critical piece of understanding to the longstanding puzzle of how the human brain wires itself into the complex networks that underlie our behavior. The discovery concerns the movements of a highly sensitive and motile...

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2010-12-10 08:12:58

By Katrina Voss, Penn State A team of scientists led by Melissa Rolls, an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, has peered inside neurons to discover an unexpected process that is required for regeneration after severe neuron injury. The process was discovered during Rolls's studies aimed at deciphering the inner workings of dendrites -- the part of the neuron that receives information from other cells and from the outside world. The research will...

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2010-04-26 14:22:53

Cancer cells need all three of their cytoskeletons"”actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments"”to metastasize, according to a study published online on April 26 in the Journal of Cell Biology. A cancer cell in an epithelial layer is trapped unless it can force through the basement membrane, which cordons off the tissue. Tumor cells start to dissolve the basement membrane with enzymes that build up within extensions called invadopodia. How the different components of the...

2010-03-02 09:25:00

Scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute have uncovered a vital clue into how the brain is wired, which could eventually steer research into nervous system disorders such as Parkinson's disease and cognitive disorders including autism. It's long been known that growing nerve fibres, also known as axons, must make connections in the brain for it to function properly. "During the brain's development, billions of nerve cells send out nerve fibres which have to find the appropriate targets...

2009-09-21 09:06:00

The human brain consists of about 100 billion (1011) neurons, which altogether form about 100 trillion (1014) synaptic connections with each other. A crucial mechanism for the generation of this complex wiring pattern is the formation of neuronal branches. The neurobiologists Dr. Hannes Schmidt and Professor Fritz G. Rathjen at the Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch, Germany, have now discovered a molecule that regulates this vital process. At the same time they have...

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2009-07-21 11:50:00

Every time a neuron sends a signal "“ to move a muscle or form a memory, for example "“ tiny membrane-bound compartments, called vesicles, dump neurotransmitters into the synapse between the cells. Researchers report that this process, which is fundamental to the workings of the nervous system, relies on a simple mechanical reality: Tension in the axon of the presynaptic neuron is required.Without this tension, the researchers found, the vesicles that must haul their chemical...

2009-04-21 14:15:02

Proteins go everywhere in the cell and do all sorts of work, but a fundamental question has eluded biologists: How do the proteins know where to go? "There's no little man sitting there, putting the protein in the right place," said Don Arnold, a molecular and computational biologist at USC College. "Proteins have to have in them encoded information that tells them where to go in the cell." In a study appearing online this week in Nature Neuroscience, Arnold and collaborators solve the...

2009-01-30 07:00:00

BOSTON, Jan. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Neurosilicon's novel Photoconductive Stimulation Device (PSD) was highlighted in the recent scientific publication by Hung and Colicos titled, Astrocytic Ca2+ Waves Guide CNS Growth Cones to Remote Regions of Neuronal Activity. The article appearing in the November 2008 issue of The Public Library of Science One journal focuses on the role of neuronal activity in mediating axonal guidance. It is known that the path axons follow is important in defining neuronal...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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