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Latest Gryposaurus Stories

c2ff8cef1cf0887a381b1558639d06061
2007-10-03 18:00:00

By BROCK VERGAKIS SALT LAKE CITY - Scientists are amazed at the chomping ability of a newly described duck-billed dinosaur. The herbivore's powerful jaw, more than 800 teeth and compact skull meant that no leaf, branch or bush would have been safe, they say. "It really is like the Arnold Schwarzenegger of dinosaurs - it's all pumped up," said Scott Sampson, curator of the Utah Museum of Natural History. The newly named Gryposaurus monumentensis, or hook-beaked lizard from the monument, was...

39fbd58f75020b771a0f714f5323d3b61
2007-10-03 15:55:00

SALT LAKE CITY -- The duck-billed dinosaur was one of the world's most imposing herbivores with as many as 800 teeth and a body that could help it knock down trees. Utah scientists have discovered one near the Arizona border that's even more threatening. "It really is like the Arnold Schwarzenegger of dinosaurs - it's all pumped up," said Scott Sampson, curator of the Utah Museum of Natural History. The newly named Gryposaurus monumentensis, or hook-beaked lizard from the monument, was...


Latest Gryposaurus Reference Libraries

45_d8f5e642bede9d1ea62420f5d01b3c84
2011-04-12 14:48:54

Gryposaurus, meaning "hooked-nosed lizard," is a genus of duckbilled dinosaur from the late Santonian to late Campanian stages of the Late Cretaceous Period (83 to 75.5 million years ago). It lived in what is now North America. It is known from the Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta, Canada; the Lower Two Medicine Formation in Montana; and the Kaiparowits Formation in Utah, USA. Gryposaurus, once thought to be part of the similar Kritosaurus genus, is known from numerous skulls, skeletal...

45_2c7683d75342cb3d8c02a23267e0caeb
2010-02-03 16:31:17

Kritosaurus, meaning "separated lizard" (sometimes misinterpreted as "noble lizard"), is a genus of duckbilled dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period (73 million years ago). It lived, possibly, in both North and South America. It was discovered in 1904 by Barnum Brown near Ojo Alamo, New Mexico. The initial discovery could not be verified age-wise, but by 1916 Brown was able to determine it came from the late Campanian age of the Kirtland Formation. It was initially named Nectosaurus, but...

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