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Latest GTPase Stories

2013-03-14 16:56:01

First-in-class chemical compound might control metastases It´s the spread of the original cancer tumor that kills most people. That´s why cancer researchers vigorously search for drugs that can prevent metastases, the spread of cancer. The research team co-led by Angela Wandinger-Ness, PhD, and Larry Sklar, PhD, at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center has found a chemical compound that appears to control cell migration and adhesion, two important characteristics of...

2012-06-21 21:01:16

Scientists have developed a small-molecule-inhibiting drug that in early laboratory cell tests stopped breast cancer cells from spreading and also promoted the growth of early nerve cells called neurites. Researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings online June 21 in Chemistry & Biology. The scientists named their lead drug candidate "Rhosin" and hope future testing shows it to be promising for the treatment of various cancers or nervous system...

2012-06-21 06:24:10

CINCINNATI, June 21, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists have developed a small-molecule-inhibiting drug that in early laboratory cell tests stopped breast cancer cells from spreading and also promoted the growth of early nerve cells called neurites. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110406/MM79025LOGO) Researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings online June 21 in Chemistry & Biology. The scientists named their lead drug...

2011-11-10 08:00:00

The EurekaMag Science Magazine has just been featured on a video available at the website's homepage and at YouTube. It has also published a new review on RhoA (ras homolog gene family, member A) which is a GTPase protein regulating a signal transduction pathway linking plasma membrane receptors to the assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. (PRWEB) November 10, 2011 The Video on EurekaMag.com which has just been uploaded to YouTube focuses on the website's vast library of...

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2010-12-29 09:38:09

By Michael Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned why changes in a single gene, ROP18, contribute substantially to dangerous forms of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The answer has likely moved science a step closer to new ways to beat Toxoplasma and many other parasites. In a study published in Cell Host & Microbe, scientists show that the ROP18 protein disables host cell proteins that would otherwise...

2010-04-29 08:44:54

The findings may lead to better methods to deliver drugs A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has discovered the structure of a protein that pinches off tiny pouches from cells' outer membranes. Cells use these pouches, or vesicles, to carry nutrients and other essential substances, but many medicines also hitch a ride inside them. The structure of the protein, called dynamin, is helping to answer many longstanding questions about...

2009-02-11 11:48:07

Scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have uncovered the transformer like properties of molecules responsible for carrying and depositing proteins to their correct locations within cells. The research could eventually lead to novel treatments for diseases that result from flaws in protein delivery as well as the development of new types of antibiotics. Shu-ou Shan, an assistant professor of chemistry at Caltech, and her colleagues looked specifically at a pair of...

2005-08-08 17:37:49

CHAPEL HILL -- Scientists from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a protein that may inhibit cellular movement, or migration. The protein, CIB1, or calcium and integrin-binding protein 1, was originally discovered at UNC in 1997 as a blood platelet protein that may play a role in clotting. Cell migration belongs to the most rudimentary of cellular functions that allow processes such as fetal...

2005-06-26 18:34:13

Our understanding of how messenger RNAs are translated into proteins is challenged by new research published today in the Open Access journal Journal of Biology. The study suggests that EF-G, the GTPase that facilitates tRNA translocation in bacteria, enters the ribosome bound to a different guanine nucleotide than previously thought "“ GDP, not GTP. The ribosome itself then seems to act as the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor, not some as-yet-unidentified factor as previously...