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Latest Gustatory system Stories

2010-05-27 17:26:53

Researchers have discovered a chemical that specifically blocks people's ability to detect the bitter aftertaste that comes with artificial sweeteners such as saccharin. The key is a molecule known only as GIV3727 that specifically targets and inhibits a handful of human bitter taste receptors, according to a report published online on May 27th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The finding of what the researchers say is the first commercially relevant small-molecule bitter taste...

2010-04-19 10:03:00

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Soma Beverage Company, leading beverage manufacturer and pioneer of the mintwater category, today announced the kickoff of The Very Short Video Contest, which invites fans of its all-natural Metromint beverages from across the U.S. to produce a 25-second video depicting their interpretation of the "Metromint experience." The grand prize winner of The Very Short Video Contest will receive a 32G iPad and the opportunity to be featured throughout...

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2010-03-08 09:40:00

There are five known tastes detected by the human tongue, -- sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (a protein-rich taste found in foods like soy sauce) -- but according to Australian researchers a sixth taste may soon be added to that list. "Through our study we can conclude that humans have a sixth taste -- fat," said Russell Keast, from Deakin University, on Monday. Researchers tested 30 people's ability to taste fatty acids placed in plain solutions and found that all of them were able to...

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2010-01-10 09:44:48

Calcium may not come to mind when you think of tasty foods, but in a study appearing in the January 8 issue of JBC, Japanese researchers have provided the first demonstration that calcium channels on the tongue are the targets of compounds that can enhance taste. In addition to molecules that directly trigger specific taste buds (salty, sweet etc.), there are other substances which have no flavor of their own but can enhance the flavors they are paired with (known as kokumi taste in Japanese...

2009-12-23 09:03:19

As anyone suffering through a head cold knows, food tastes wrong when the nose is clogged, an experience that leads many to conclude that the sense of taste operates normally only when the olfactory system is also in good working order. Evidence that the taste system influences olfactory perception, however, has been vanishingly rare"”until now. In a novel study this week in Nature Neuroscience, Brandeis researchers report just such an influence. Neuroscientist Don Katz and colleagues...

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2009-10-16 13:40:00

Scientists have found out how people can taste the bubbly sensation from carbonated beverages. The answer appears to lie in an enzyme on the surface of sour-sensing cells in taste buds, researchers reported in the journal Science. Researchers at National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and colleagues from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) used mice in their study. Mice have a similar...

2009-10-15 14:49:51

In 1767, chemist Joseph Priestley stood in his laboratory one day with an idea to help English mariners stay healthy on long ocean voyages. He infused water with carbon dioxide to create an effervescent liquid that mimicked the finest mineral waters consumed at European health spas. Priestley's man-made tonic, which he urged his benefactors to test aboard His Majesty's ships, never prevented a scurvy outbreak. But, as the decades passed, his carbonated water became popular in cities and towns...

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2009-08-20 15:50:46

A study of 62 soldiers found that smokers had fewer and flatter taste buds than nonsmokers, researchers in Greece said. Study leader Pavlidis Pavlos of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki said the team used electrical stimulation to test the taste threshold of the soldiers and endoscopes to measure the number and shape of a kind of taste bud called fungiform papillae. Statistically important differences between the taste thresholds of smokers and non-smokers were detected, Pavlos said in a...

2009-07-24 15:40:46

The same mechanism that helps you detect bad-tasting and potentially poisonous foods may also play a role in protecting your airway from harmful substances, according to a study by scientists at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The findings could help explain why injured lungs are susceptible to further damage.The study, published online July 23 in Science Express, shows that receptors for bitter compounds that are found in taste buds on the tongue also...

2009-07-08 13:27:35

Using a combination of sensory, genetic, and in vitro approaches, researchers from the Monell Center confirm that the T1R1-T1R3 taste receptor plays a role in human umami (amino acid) taste.They further report that variations in the genes that code for this receptor correspond to individual variation in sensitivity to and perceived intensity of umami taste."These findings bolster our understanding of human taste variation and individual differences in tastes for essential nutrients," says...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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