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Latest Gut flora Stories

Bacteria-eating Viruses Are 'Magic Bullets' In The War On Superbugs
2013-10-17 06:48:18

University of Leicester A specialist team of scientists from the University of Leicester has isolated viruses that eat bacteria -- called phages -- to specifically target the highly infectious hospital superbug Clostridium difficile (C. diff). Now an exciting new collaboration between the University of Leicester, the University of Glasgow and AmpliPhi Biosciences Corporation could lead to the use of bacteriophages for treating the superbug Clostridium difficile infections. Dr Martha...

2013-10-15 23:22:31

Exclusive Distribution by Biotecnologia 3000 C.A. Will Generate Innovative Foods & Beverages Cleveland, OH (PRWEB) October 15, 2013 Ganeden Biotech, a recognized world leader in the manufacturing and marketing of probiotics, announced today that GanedenBC30 (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086) is the first Bacillus coagulans to be approved by the Venezuelan Popular Power Ministry of Health for Food Applications, and will now be available in Venezuela as a result of an exclusive...

2013-10-10 23:00:49

DailyGossip.org recently published a complex review to the Candida Crusher program, the latest natural treatment that can cure candida forever. Denver, Colorado (PRWEB) October 10, 2013 The Candida Crusher review reveals that this natural treatment was created by a former sufferer of this illness. Eric Bakker found this unique formula after years of study and research. to read the full review go...

2013-10-08 11:34:32

Many chemicals we use in everyday life are derived from fossil resources. Due to the increasing concerns on the use of fossil resources, there has been much interest in producing chemicals from renewable resources through biotechnology. Phenol is an important commodity chemical, and is a starting material for the production of numerous industrial chemicals and polymers, including bisphenol A and phenolic resins, and others. At present, the production of phenol entirely depends on the...

Poop Pill Cures Intestinal Infections
2013-10-04 12:24:35

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Recent studies have shown infections with the bacteria Clostridium difficile (C. diff) can be cured if other bacteria can be transplanted into the patient’s gut. Doctors from Amsterdam, Canada and elsewhere have successfully transferred these bacteria by means of fecal transplant, or placing a sterile stool sample from a healthy person into the patient’s stomach. Tests have shown this procedure is highly effective, curing up to 94...

2013-10-03 09:27:34

In a recent study, two different strains of non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile provided protection against both historic and epidemic C. difficile strains. The research was conducted by researchers at Hines VA Hospital and is published ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Studies show colonization with a non-disease-causing strain of C. difficile can prevent infection by the more dangerous strains. Patients who are not colonized by benign strains may risk...

2013-09-30 12:48:15

Findings point to new approach to drug design Highlighting an important but unexplored area of evolution, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found evidence that, over hundreds of millions of years, an essential protein has evolved chiefly by changing how it moves, rather than by changing its basic molecular structure. The work has implications not only for the understanding of protein evolution, but also for the design of antibiotics and other drugs that target the...

Cattle Vaccinations Could Reduce Human E. Coli Infection Rates
2013-09-17 07:51:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The number of people who fall ill due to E. coli contamination could be drastically reduced if cattle were vaccinated against the bacterium, according to research published in the online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The E. coli O157 bacterium can result in severe gastrointestinal illness and is potentially fatal in humans. The pathogen is spread by consuming contaminated food and...


Latest Gut flora Reference Libraries

Large Intestine
2013-04-30 14:11:04

The large intestine is the organ that follows the small intestine but is the last part of the digestive tract before the waste leaves the body. Formation and Orientation The small intestine is on average about five feet long. It is composed of four distinct structural parts; the cecum, colon, and anus. The cecum is the part of the large intestine that comes first. It is separated into three parts. The taeniae coli are three bands of smooth muscle. The haustra are bulges caused by...

72_04c5b3879bb85672771defa94bb4ac91
2011-04-15 14:54:29

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most strains are harmless; however, some such as O157:H7 can cause food poisoning in humans and are often responsible for product recalls. The normal flora of the gut normally contains the harmless strains and often provide K2 to the body. They are not always confined to the intestine and have the ability to survive briefly outside of the body. It grows easily...

0_9f897835bb09adc2a84fda23893d87f8
2011-04-15 13:50:01

Clostridium difficile, also known as "CDF/cdf", or "C. diff", is a Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Clostridium that causes severe diarrhea and other intestinal disease when competing bacteria in the gut flora are wiped out by antibiotics. They are anaerobic, spore-forming rods and is the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and potentially to pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile bacteria naturally resides in the gut of a small percentage of the adult population. Others...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.