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Gut flora Reference Libraries

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Large Intestine
2013-04-30 14:11:04

The large intestine is the organ that follows the small intestine but is the last part of the digestive tract before the waste leaves the body. Formation and Orientation The small intestine is on average about five feet long. It is composed of four distinct structural parts; the cecum, colon, and anus. The cecum is the part of the large intestine that comes first. It is separated into...

Escherichia coli
2011-04-15 14:54:29

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most strains are harmless; however, some such as O157:H7 can cause food poisoning in humans and are often responsible for product recalls. The normal flora of the gut normally contains the harmless strains and often provide K2 to the body. They are not always...

Clostridium difficile
2011-04-15 13:50:01

Clostridium difficile, also known as "CDF/cdf", or "C. diff", is a Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Clostridium that causes severe diarrhea and other intestinal disease when competing bacteria in the gut flora are wiped out by antibiotics. They are anaerobic, spore-forming rods and is the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and potentially to pseudomembranous colitis. C....

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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