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Latest Hagfish Stories

2014-04-04 11:46:23

University of Guelph researchers have unraveled some of the inner workings of slime produced by one of nature's most bizarre creatures – hagfish. They've learned how the super-strong and mega-long protein threads secreted by the eel-like animals are organized at the cellular level. Their research was published today in the science journal Nature Communications. The slime-making process has fascinated and perplexed biologists for more than 100 years, says lead author Prof. Douglas...

Vertebrate Study Reveals The Evolution Of The Face
2014-02-13 09:19:21

[ Watch the Video: Animation Sequence of Romundina Fish Fossil ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Faces allow us to recognize each other almost instantaneously – so much so that they are the primary feature on our driver’s licenses and other identification cards. A study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature has revealed new details on the evolution of the jaw – a major defining structure in the evolution of the face. In the study, a team of...

2010-10-06 17:12:19

Looking at a hagfish "“ an eyeless, snot-covered, worm-like scavenger of the deep "“the last thing that comes to mind is sex. Yet the reproductive functioning of these ancient vertebrates is such an enduring enigma that a gold medal was once offered to anyone who could elucidate it. Although the prize expired, unclaimed, long ago, University of New Hampshire professor of biochemistry Stacia Sower and colleagues at two Japanese universities have identified the first reproductive...

2008-08-17 18:00:23

RESEARCH on the diet of the toothless and blind hagfish has won Rebecca McLeod the 2008 MacDiarmid Young Scientist of the Year award. The marine ecologist studies the diet of the primitive scavenging creature, which lives up to 400 metres below sea level in New Zealand fiords. Her research showed clearing coastal forests can alter the way marine ecosystems work. The work has implications for coastal management in New Zealand and internationally. Dr McLeod won the $10,000 premier...

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2007-06-20 15:20:00

By NOAKI SCHWARTZ LOS ANGELES - The hagfish is a bottom feeder so repulsive it had a cameo on TV's "Fear Factor." It slimes its enemies, has rows of teeth on its tongue, and feeds on the innards of rotting fish by penetrating any orifice. But cooked and served on a plate, it is considered an aphrodisiac in South Korea. And the overseas appetite for the hagfish - also known as the slime eel - is creating a business opportunity for struggling West Coast fishermen confronted with tough...


Latest Hagfish Reference Libraries

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2009-01-20 20:31:33

The Pacific Hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) also known as the Slime Eel, is a species of hagfish that is found in the mesopelagic (600 to 3000 feet deep) to abyssal (13,000 to 21,000 feet deep) Pacific ocean, near the ocean floor. In many parts of the world, including the USA, hagfish-skin clothing, belts, and other accessories are advertised and sold as "yuppie leather" or "eel-skin". Hagfish, however, are not true eels. This is a jawless fish, as it evolved to lose this trait from the early...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.