Quantcast

Latest Hair cell Stories

2014-05-20 23:04:58

Discovery May Point to Way to Restore Hearing Loss Caused by Sound, Age Charlottesville, VA (PRWEB) May 20, 2014 The ability to discern pitch – to hear the difference between “cat,” “bat” and “hat,” for example – hinges on remarkable gradations in specialized cells within the inner ear. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders has explained, for the first time, what controls these...

2014-03-12 11:34:45

Multiple regions in the human genome are reported to be linked to musical aptitude, according to a study published this week in Molecular Psychiatry. The function of the candidate genes implicated in the study ranges from inner-ear development to auditory neurocognitive processes, suggesting that musical aptitude is affected by a combination of genes involved in the auditory pathway. The research was funded by the Academy of Finland. The perception of music starts with specialized hair...

2013-10-16 08:58:13

The death of sensory hair cells in the ear results in irreversible hearing loss. Several classes of drugs, including aminoglycoside antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs are known to kill hair cells; however, in many cases the benefit of using the drug outweighs the potential for hearing loss. Previous research has shown that a class of proteins induced in response to cell stress, the heat shock proteins (HSPs), can protect against sensory hair cell death in response to ototoxic drugs. Despite...

2013-09-18 13:04:19

Suggests the potential for future molecular approaches, which may include gene therapy or medicine, to treat hearing loss Researchers from the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School have created a new mouse model in which by expressing a gene in the inner ear hair cells -- the sensory cells that detect sound and sense balance -- protects the mice from age-related hearing loss (ARHL) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the two most common...

2013-08-01 23:04:18

Sound Relief Hearing Center reports that researchers in a study at the Stanford School of Medicine find some hearing loss may be reversed. Denver, CO (PRWEB) August 01, 2013 Some promising news on the horizon for our men and women in uniform. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine recently published a paper that suggests long-term hearing loss caused by loud blasts or explosions may one day be reversible in humans. The team’s research disproved the previously held...

2013-07-22 13:07:16

A recent study published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 17, 2013) injected recombinant lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein and the target gene Atoh1 into the cochlea of normal rats using a postauricular approach via the round window membrane. After 30 days, recombinant lentivirus was shown to have no impact on the hair cell numbers and auditory functions, infect hair and supporting cells, and promote supporting cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells....

2013-07-02 10:53:40

Long-term hearing loss from loud explosions, such as blasts from roadside bombs, may not be as irreversible as previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Using a mouse model, the study found that loud blasts actually cause hair-cell and nerve-cell damage, rather than structural damage, to the cochlea, which is the auditory portion of the inner ear. This could be good news for the millions of soldiers and civilians who, after...

2013-06-12 16:08:32

Mechanism offers potential for interventions that could save hearing A team of NIH-supported researchers is the first to show, in mice, an unexpected two-step process that happens during the growth and regeneration of inner ear tip links. Tip links are extracellular tethers that link stereocilia, the tiny sensory projections on inner ear hair cells that convert sound into electrical signals, and play a key role in hearing. The discovery offers a possible mechanism for potential...

2013-02-26 11:54:12

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a group of progenitor cells in the inner ear that can become the sensory hair cells and adjacent supporting cells that enable hearing. Studying these progenitor cells could someday lead to discoveries that help millions of Americans suffering from hearing loss due to damaged or impaired sensory hair cells. "It's well known that, in mammals, these specialized sensory cells don't regenerate after damage," said Alan...

2013-01-28 12:03:00

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Karen Avraham and colleagues at Tel Aviv University identified a genetic mutation in two families with hereditary high frequency hearing loss. The mutated gene, which has not previously been linked to hearing loss, encodes NESP4, a protein that is expressed in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) of the hair cells of the ear. Avraham and colleagues found that mutated NESP4 was mislocalized, disrupting a cellular complex known as the "linker...


Latest Hair cell Reference Libraries

Ear
2013-04-30 13:31:11

The ear is an organ from the auditory system that collects sounds, and also balances and enables body position. Formation and Orientation The ear can be broken down into the inner and outer ears. The outer part of the ear is the visible flap (auricle) and ear canal which collects sounds which create pressure that echoes through the middle ear. The inner ear, however, is embedded in the temporal bone. There are hollow areas of the inner ear that are filled with liquids and hair cells...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related