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Latest Halophile Stories

Tolerance Lessons From A Dead Sea Fungus
2014-05-12 03:53:13

Despite its name, the Dead Sea does support life, and not just in the sense of helping visitors float in its waters. Algae, bacteria, and fungi make up the limited number of species that can tolerate the extremely salty environment at the lowest point on Earth.

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2008-05-29 00:20:00

A new analysis of the Martian rock that gave hints of water on the Red Planet now suggests the water was more likely a thick brine, far too salty to support life as we know it.

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2006-10-23 19:10:00

A class of especially hardy microbes that live in some of the harshest Earthly environments could flourish on cold Mars and other chilly planets, according to a research team of astronomers and microbiologists.

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2005-07-19 12:28:10

How have the molecules essential to life, such as proteins, adapted to function in extreme environments? The proteins that may help answer this question have been isolated from halophilic (salt-loving) microorganisms from the Dead Sea. So what's living in the Dead Sea anyway?

2005-07-12 00:30:00

Over the years, a number of Weizmann Institute scientists have addressed the question of how molecules essential to life, such as proteins, have adapted to function in extreme environments.


Word of the Day
plim
  • To swell, as grain or wood with water.
The word 'plim' is probably a variant of the word 'plum'.
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