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Latest Hans Joachim Schellnhuber Stories

Trapped Giant Waves In The Atmosphere Trigger More Extreme Weather
2014-08-13 03:46:00

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) Weather extremes in the summer - such as the record heat wave in the United States that hit corn farmers and worsened wildfires in 2012 - have reached an exceptional number in the last ten years. Man-made global warming can explain a gradual increase in periods of severe heat, but the observed change in the magnitude and duration of some events is not so easily explained. It has been linked to a recently discovered mechanism: the...

2009-09-23 12:00:00

STOCKHOLM/>, September 23/> /PRNewswire/ -- New approaches are needed to help humanity deal with climate change and other global environmental threats that lie ahead in the 21st century. A group of 28 internationally renowned scientists propose that global biophysical boundaries, identified on the basis of the scientific understanding of the Earth System, can define a 'safe planetary operating space' that will allow humanity to continue to develop and thrive for generations to come....

2009-08-24 17:04:16

The article "Tipping elements in the Earth's climate system" has been named one of the most highly-cited in the field of Geosciences published during the past two years. The media corporation Thomson Reuters has identified the article that appeared in the journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" in February 2008 as a New Hot Paper."The article captures the Zeitgeist of a growing group of climate scientists who perceive that human activities are already pushing Earth's climate...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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