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Latest Harmful algal bloom Stories

'Red Tide' Species Deadlier Than First Thought
2012-07-25 15:15:43

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A researcher at the University of Connecticut and his team have discovered that a species of tiny aquatic organism prominent in harmful algal blooms sometimes called "red tide" is even deadlier than first thought, with potential consequences for entire marine food chains. Professor Hans Dam along with his research group in the school's Department of Marine Sciences have discovered that the plankton species Alexandrium tamarense...

2011-10-03 15:19:42

Harmful algal blooms that affect seafood on the rise in California With toxic algal blooms – which can increase the amount of harmful toxins in the shellfish that California residents consume – ramping up in frequency and severity locally, scientists at USC have developed a new algae monitoring method in hopes of one day being able to predict when and where toxic "red tides" will occur. "We have, what we fear, is a hotspot here for some types of toxic algal blooms," said...

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2011-06-10 11:08:21

Fish farming is the world's fastest growing food production method and is projected to continue rising to meet the demands of an increasing world population. ESA's new Aquaculture project will support sustainable aquaculture by developing an information service based on state-of-the-art remote sensing. Satellites can provide a wealth of data on waves, sea-surface temperature and ocean color "“ all highly useful for planning where to establish new fish farms. "Sustainability depends on...

2011-02-24 15:32:28

Researchers conduct first-ever genetic sequencing of harmful algal blooms A team involving University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers has conducted the first-ever genetic sequencing of a harmful algal bloom (HAB) species, cracking the genome of the micro-organism responsible for the Eastern Seaboard's notorious brown tides. Brown tides decimated the scallop industries of New York and New Jersey in the 1980s and 1990s and continue to plague the waters off North America and South Africa....

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2011-02-21 15:23:19

For the first time, researchers have sequenced the genome of a harmful algal bloom species. Researchers found that Aureococcus' unique gene complement allows it to outcompete other marine phytoplankton and thrive in human-modified ecosystems, which could help explain the global increases in harmful algal blooms. The brown tides caused by Aureococcus do not produce toxins that poison humans, but the long-lasting blooms are toxic to bivalves and have decimated sea grass beds leading to...

2011-02-20 21:50:51

New studies demonstrate potential increases in waterborne toxins and microbes A panel of scientists speaking today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled new research and models demonstrating how climate change could increase exposure and risk of human illness originating from ocean, coastal and Great Lakes ecosystems, with some studies projecting impacts to be felt within 30 years. "With 2010 the wettest year on record and third...

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2011-02-20 07:05:00

US scientists, speaking at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington Saturday, said climate change could increase exposure to water-borne diseases originating in the world's oceans, lakes and coastal ecosystems, adding that the impact will most likely be felt within the next 30 years, and as early as the next 10 years. Numerous studies have shown that shifts from climate change make ocean and freshwater ecosystems more susceptible to...

2011-02-17 08:43:40

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Blue-green algae may be responsible for producing an estrogen-like compound in the environment which could disrupt the normal activity of reproductive hormones and adversely affect fish, plants, and human health. Previously, human activities were thought to be responsible for producing these impacts. Researchers looked into blue-green algae and their effects on zebrafish. They discovered the algae may add a new harmful element into the way they understand and...

2011-02-16 12:58:47

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers have found that blue-green algae may be responsible for producing an estrogen-like compound in the environment which could disrupt the normal activity of reproductive hormones University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers have found that blue-green algae may be responsible for producing an estrogen-like compound in the environment which could disrupt the normal activity of reproductive hormones and adversely affect fish, plants and human...

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2011-02-09 11:40:00

Our growing reliance on coastal waters for food, trade and tourism means that these delicate ecosystems need to be more closely monitored to guarantee their future sustainability. ESA's CoastColour project is helping scientists develop techniques to take full advantage of the unique capabilities of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) sensor on its Envisat satellite. With a resolution of 300 m, MERIS provides the sharpest view of coastal waters to date, and includes spectral...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.