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Latest Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Stories

Rubber Band Distortions Lead To Discovery Of A New Shape
2014-04-24 12:33:38

[ Watch the Video: Rubber Bands Help Scientists Discover New Shape ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a new report published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, a team of Harvard University engineers have described the factors behind the creation of a hemihelix, a distorted version of a regular helix, from elastic rubber bands. The Harvard team said these newly-described factors could inform the creation of new geometric shapes at the molecular level. "Once...

2013-09-25 11:04:21

Comparing species, researchers at Harvard SEAS and Harvard Medical School investigate a process they dub “villification” “You are not just a ball of cells,” says Clifford Tabin, George Jacob and Jacqueline Hazel Leder Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School (HMS). The way cells organize within the human body allows us all to function the way we do, but a couple of Harvard professors are concerned as much with that developmental process as with the end result. Tabin...

Wildfires Could Become More Frequent Due To Changing Climate
2013-08-29 08:15:05

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Western US, where firefighters are currently battling dozens of fires in at least 11 states, has received bad news from a new study led by environmental scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). The study, published online and in an upcoming print issue of Atmospheric Environment, suggests wildfire seasons by 2050 will be about three weeks longer, up to twice as smoky, and will burn a wider area...

Advancing Artificial Vision, 3D Displays And Video Editing
2013-07-23 13:55:58

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences New research in computer graphics, presented at SIGGRAPH, will advance artificial vision, 3D displays, and video editing Computer graphics and digital video lag behind reality; despite advances, the best software and video cameras still cannot seem to get computer-generated images and digital film to look exactly the way our eyes expect them to. But Hanspeter Pfister and Todd Zickler, computer science faculty at the Harvard School of...

Tiny Robotic Insects Take Flight
2013-05-03 09:06:20

[ Watch the Video: Controlled Flight Of A Biologically Inspired Robot ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Last summer, in the early hours of the morning, Harvard engineer“¯Pakpong Chirarattananon looked on as a tiny metallic insect jumped, hovered and then sped through the air along a preset route. The Harvard graduate student had just witnessed the first flight of an insect-sized robot and the result of more than a decade's worth of work. "I was...

Harvard Engineers Design TakkTile Sensors For Robots
2013-04-18 18:27:32

Enid Burns for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online When we think of robots, we typically think of the metal behemoth from Forbidden Planet, or Rosie from The Jetsons. In reality, many companies use robots to manufacture, pack and transport goods. However, they are often an arm fixed to the floor or other surface. These robots are heavy, strong, and do their job without sensing the needs of what they´re holding. That is, unless there are sensors so the robot can detect the...

Color-tunable Photonic Fibers Mimic The Fruit Of The “Bastard Hogberry” Plant
2013-01-28 14:29:04

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences A team of materials scientists at Harvard University and the University of Exeter, UK, have invented a new fiber that changes color when stretched. Inspired by nature, the researchers identified and replicated the unique structural elements that create the bright iridescent blue color of a tropical plant´s fruit. The multilayered fiber, described today in the journal Advanced Materials, could lend itself to the creation of smart...

New Device Could Contribute To A Major Increase In The Rate Of Future Optical Communications
2013-01-08 20:58:34

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences At a time when communication networks are scrambling for ways to transmit more data over limited bandwidth, a type of twisted light wave is gaining new attention. Called an optical vortex or vortex beam, this complex beam resembles a corkscrew, with waves that rotate as they travel. Now, applied physicists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have created a new device that enables a conventional optical...

Sponge Delivers Drugs And Cells Directly To The Body Through Injection
2012-11-14 10:27:19

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Bioengineers from Harvard recently revealed that they have been able to develop injectable gel-based sponges that can deliver cells and drugs as well as be shaped into whatever size or form. In particular, the sponge is able to revert back to its original shape once it has released whatever drugs or stem cells inside the body. Researchers believe that the item could be used for therapeutic purposes as a prefabricated healing...

Signal Loss In On-chip Optics Could Be Eliminated With Needle Beam
2012-09-07 09:33:17

Harvard researchers create a light wave that propagates without spreading An international, Harvard-led team of researchers have demonstrated a new type of light beam that propagates without spreading outwards, remaining very narrow and controlled along an unprecedented distance. This "needle beam," as the team calls it, could greatly reduce signal loss for on-chip optical systems and may eventually assist the development of a more powerful class of microprocessors. Based at the Harvard...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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