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Latest Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Stories

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2011-04-04 11:45:07

Surprising phenomenon may lead to greater sensitivity in image sensor devices Engineers may soon be singing, "I'm going to wash that gray right out of my nanowires," thanks to a colorful discovery by a team of researchers from Harvard University and Zena Technologies. In contrast to the somber gray hue of silicon wafers, Kenneth B. Crozier and colleagues demonstrated that individual, vertical silicon nanowires can shine in all colors of the spectrum. The vibrant display, dependent on the...

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2011-01-21 09:46:04

Microfluidics Lab at Harvard provides new core facility for undergraduate teaching With little more than a conventional photocopier and transparency film, anyone can build a functional microfluidic chip. A local Cambridge high school physics teacher invented the process; now, thanks to a new undergraduate teaching lab at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), students will be able explore microfluidics and its applications. The Microfluidics Lab, developed by Dr. Anas...

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2010-12-14 09:50:53

Breakthrough elliptical cavity enables a wide range of applications in photonics Utilizing a century-old phenomenon discovered in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, applied scientists at Harvard University have demonstrated, for the first time, highly collimated unidirectional microlasers. The result of a collaboration with researchers from Hamamatsu Photonics in Hamamatsu City, Japan, and the Institute of Theoretical Physics of the University of Magdeburg, Germany, the advance has a wide range of...

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2010-09-17 09:06:13

Precipitation-controlling aerosols over the Amazon rainforest originate from the forest ecosystem A team of environmental engineers, who might better be called "archeologists of the air," have, for the first time, isolated aerosol particles in near pristine pre-industrial conditions. Working in the remote Amazonian Basin north of Manaus, Brazil, the researchers measured particles emitted or formed within the rainforest ecosystem that are relatively free from the influence of anthropogenic, or...

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2010-08-09 06:30:20

Advance in metamaterials leads to a new semiconductor laser suitable for security screening, chemical sensing and astronomy A collaborative team of applied scientists from Harvard University and the University of Leeds have demonstrated a new terahertz (THz) semiconductor laser that emits beams with a much smaller divergence than conventional THz laser sources. The advance, published in the August 8th issue of Nature Materials, opens the door to a wide range of applications in terahertz...

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2010-07-21 09:10:00

Silicon microring resonator could help advance nanomanipulation To trap and hold tiny microparticles, engineers at Harvard have "put a ring on it," using a silicon-based circular resonator to confine particles stably for up to several minutes. The advance, published in the June 14 issue of Nano Letters, could one day lead to the ability to direct, deliver, and store nanoparticles and biomolecules on all-optical chips. "We demonstrated the power of what we call resonant cavity trapping, where...

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2010-06-29 06:35:00

Relying on origami techniques, researchers show programmable matter folding into a boat- or plane-shape "More than meets the eye" may soon become more than just a tagline for a line of popular robotic toys. Researchers at Harvard and MIT have reshaped the landscape of programmable matter by devising self-folding sheets that rely on the ancient art of origami. Called programmable matter by folding, the team demonstrated how a single thin sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections...

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2010-06-10 06:20:00

Scientists reported on Wednesday that bubbles do not just disappear when they pop, but actually deflate in a rapid cascade of bubbles. The physics behind this bursting effect seems to hold true whether the liquid is as thin as water or as thick as heavy oil, suggesting a universal theory of how bubbles behave when they break. According to the study published in the British journal Nature, a host of practical applications could follow in areas ranging from health care to climate to glass...

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2010-05-28 09:16:44

Scalable devices inspired by nature exhibit customizable optical properties suitable for applications ranging from highly sensitive sensors and detectors to invisibility cloaks Imagine creating novel devices with amazing and exotic optical properties not found in Nature"”by simply evaporating a droplet of particles on a surface. By chemically building clusters of nanospheres from a liquid, a team of Harvard researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Rice University, the University...

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2010-05-25 08:48:17

Offering increased control and higher output, device could be a boon for industrial applications, from biocompatible materials to air filters Hailed as a "cross between a high-speed centrifuge and a cotton candy machine," bioengineers at Harvard have developed a new, practical technology for fabricating tiny nanofibers. The reference by lead author Mohammad Reza Badrossamay to the fairground treat of spun sugar is deliberate, as the device literally"”and just as easily"”spins,...


Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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