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Latest Harvard School of Public Health Stories

2014-07-11 09:19:30

Harvard School of Public Health Vasectomy was associated with a small increased risk of prostate cancer, and a stronger risk for advanced or lethal prostate cancer according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The researchers found that the association remained even among men who received regular PSA screening, suggesting the increased risk of lethal cancer cannot be explained by diagnostic bias. It is the largest and most comprehensive study to date to look at the...

2014-07-09 16:26:46

Case featuring success of Access Health CT will be taught as part of curriculum at Harvard Business School and Harvard School of Public Health SOUTHPORT, Conn., July 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The launch of Access Health CT, Connecticut's official health insurance marketplace (also known as the Exchange), is the subject of an upcoming marketing case study authored by Harvard Business School professor John A. Quelch for use at both Harvard Business School (HBS) and Harvard School of...

2014-06-17 12:29:10

Dr. David Bor of Cambridge Health Alliance, Dr. Aretha Delight Davis of ACP Decisions, and Dr. Michael Fine of the RI Department of Health Join Lown Institute Board of Directors BOSTON, June 17, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Lown Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to restoring the relationship between the doctor and patient and protecting patients from inappropriate tests and treatments, elected three directors to serve on its board. "The real quest in medicine...

2014-06-17 11:04:52

Harvard School of Public Health Support for the national health law higher in MA than in U.S. A new poll by The Boston Globe and Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) finds, eight years into the state’s universal health insurance legislation enacted in 2006, 63% of Massachusetts residents support the law and 18% oppose it, while 7% are not sure, and 12% have not heard or read about the law. The percentage of residents supporting the law remains unchanged since a 2011 Boston...

2014-05-21 10:33:18

Harvard School of Public Health Research in mammals that aims to prevent future influenza pandemics raises ethical, public health concerns Experiments creating dangerous flu strains that are transmissible between mammals pose too great a risk to human life from potential release, according to an editorial by researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Yale School of Public Health. The researchers are calling for greater scrutiny of experiments that make virulent...

2014-05-09 19:56:43

Harvard School of Public Health Two widely used neonicotinoids—a class of insecticide—appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The study replicated a 2012 finding from the same research group that found a link between low doses of imidacloprid and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which bees abandon their hives over the winter and eventually die. The new...

2014-05-06 14:47:59

Findings offer insights into population-level health effects that could occur under Affordable Care Act In the first four years after Massachusetts instituted comprehensive health reform in 2006, mortality in the state decreased by 2.9% compared with similar populations in states that didn't expand health coverage, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. They estimated that Massachusetts' health reform law, which provided near-universal coverage,...

Diabetes Risk May Be Lessened Over Time With Increased Coffee Consumption
2014-04-25 08:34:18

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research led by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) has found that increasing coffee consumption over four years leads to a lower risk for type 2 diabetes; while decreasing coffee consumption over the same time span increases risk for the metabolic condition. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia, was based on three big prospective, US-based studies and included over 120,000 men and women. The...

2014-04-16 14:06:40

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity—the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys—are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing...

Many Common Household Products Contain DNA-Damaging Nanoparticles: Study
2014-04-11 07:48:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Some nanoparticles commonly added to thousands of consumer products can significantly damage DNA, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). These products, which include cosmetics, sunscreens, clothing and other common items, contain nanoparticles added by manufacturers to, among other things, improve texture, kill microbes, or enhance shelf life. But the current study...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.